Science & Medicine

The Two-Way
10:06 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Seattle Cuts Public Transportation Fares For Low-Income Commuters

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 1:06 am

Yesterday, Seattle began offering some commuters lower fares for public transit based on their income. Individuals making less than $23,340 a year and families of four making less than $47,700 annually now qualify for a program called ORCA LIFT, which will give users rates of $1.50 per ride, less than half of usual peak fares. [ORCA stands for "One Regional Card For All."]

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The Two-Way
7:28 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Obama Says Iran Should Commit To 10-Year Freeze Of Nuclear Program

President Barack Obama in the Oval Office.
Evan Vucci AP

President Obama says reaching a long-term deal with Iran is the best way to assure that the country does not attain a nuclear weapon.

Obama made the comments in interview with Reuters, just a day before Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is set to speak to a joint meeting of Congress in which he will lay out his reasons for opposing a diplomatic deal with its enemy.

The wire service reports:

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Code Switch
6:38 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Before Rosa Parks, A Teenager Defied Segregation On An Alabama Bus

"I knew why they chose Rosa" Parks instead of her as a symbol of the civil rights movement, Colvin says. "They thought I would be too militant for them."
Julie Jacobson AP

Originally published on Mon March 2, 2015 7:45 pm

Rosa Parks is well-known for her refusal to give up her seat to a white passenger on a public bus in Montgomery, Ala., in December 1955. But Parks' civil rights protest did have a precedent: Fifteen-year-old Claudette Colvin, a student from a black high school in Montgomery, had refused to move from her bus seat nine months earlier. However, Colvin is not nearly as well-known, and certainly not as celebrated, as Parks.

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The Two-Way
6:06 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

With Much Controversy, Boston Begins Removing Parking Space Savers

A fashion doll in a milk crate saves a parking space on a residential street in South Boston.
Elise Amendola AP

The near-record amount of snow that has fallen on Boston this winter is testing one of the city's great traditions: On orders from Mayor Martin J. Walsh, the Public Works Department began removing parking space savers from city streets on Monday.

In the past, the informal rule has been that whoever takes the time to dig out a parking space gets to keep it for 48 hours. But this year, the city has gotten about 100 inches of snow and those 48 hours have turned into weeks.

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NPR Ombudsman
5:50 pm
Mon March 2, 2015

Blurred Lines: A Tricky Transition From Editorial To Promotional Content

A case of unfortunate timing this past weekend had some listeners seeing a plot where none existed.

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