Science & Medicine

Science news

For the first time in almost 25 years, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs will pay for In Vitro Fertilization for wounded veterans.

As NPR's Quil Lawrence explains, Congress has reversed a law passed in 1992 that "prohibited the Department of Veterans Affairs from paying for IVF for veterans and their families." Quil tells our Newscast unit that "inside the stopgap spending bill passed this week is a provision to allow fertility treatments including IVF through VA health care." Here's more from Quil:

The U.N. is planning to launch its first space mission into orbit, packed with scientific experiments from countries that can't afford their own space programs.

It's teaming up with the Sierra Nevada Corporation, which makes the Dream Chaser, a reuseable spacecraft that, when it returns from orbit, can land at an ordinary airport. They formally announced the plans this week at the International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico.

Episode 727: You Asked For It, Again

4 hours ago

We dug through the trash and tracked down experts around the globe to make sense of economic mysteries that you sent us. There's a puzzle about the cost of postage stamps, a debate over the price of happiness, fatal pastries and a little stop at the Federal Reserve, because, yeah, we're Planet Money.

You, our enthusiastic, curious listeners, can get a little wonky with your questions and we love you for it. But we can still have way too much fun fishing out the answers from all corners of the word. Today on the show, we answer your questions, wherever they lead us.

On Friday, police released two videos of Tuesday's fatal shooting of an unarmed black man by officers in the San Diego suburb of El Cajon, Calif. Ugandan immigrant Alfred Olango was killed after, police say, he was uncooperative and refused to remove his hand from his pocket, then took what officers saw as a threatening position.

Olango's death led to almost immediate protests that lasted much of the week and grew progressively larger and angrier. The police say that by Thursday night two civilians had been assaulted and crowds had thrown bottles at officers.

Both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump released their medical records earlier this month, and now it's Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson's turn to boast that he is "extremely physically fit."

The letter from the former New Mexico governor's physician, Dr. Lyle B. Amer of Santa Fe, explains that the 63-year-old Johnson's "decades of dedication to physical fitness, diet, no drinking, and no smoking have paid dividends as far as his current extraordinarily good health at this time of his life." (We'll come back to that smoking line).

It's been one year since health officials in Michigan warned people in the city of Flint to stop drinking the tap water after a research team from Virginia Tech discovered elevated lead levels.

To this day, Flint's water is still not safe to drink without a filter. While funding has been scarce to replace corroded pipes, Congress reached a deal this week that could send millions of dollars in aid to Flint.

It's one of the most famous delis in the U.S., if not the world; its food has been called "nearly orgasmic" — but now comes word that New York's famed Carnegie Delicatessen will be closing its doors at the end of 2016.

Lee Musiker On Piano Jazz

8 hours ago

Grammy- and Emmy-winning conductor, pianist, composer and arranger Lee Musiker has long worked with leading jazz, classical, pop and Broadway performers. He conducted the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the National Orchestra in the U.S. and Canada. His work can also be heard on the soundtracks of major Hollywood films.

Musiker brings a wealth of knowledge to this 2005 episode of Piano Jazz, on which he performs "Fascinating Rhythm" with host Marian McPartland.

Italian Police Recover Stolen Van Gogh Paintings

8 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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