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Rolls-Royce and the state are chipping in to expand Purdue University’s work on making small gas-powered turbine engines more efficient.

The company already opened one big facility at Purdue this year. Now, it’s investing another $10 million into two new wind tunnels at Purdue’s turbine research lab.

Mechanical engineering professor Guillermo Paniagua leads the research there. He explains what gas turbine engines do.

courtesy Purdue Center for the Human-Animal Bond

Purdue University researchers are preparing to embark on a study showing whether dogs help ease the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder in soldiers.

Previous research has relied mostly on anecdotal evidence showing pets calm their humans and make them happier.

But Purdue human-animal interaction professor Maggie O’Haire says her team will take a number of extra steps, including measuring levels of the stress hormone cortisol and getting in touch with participants at times they won’t expect.

A novel way to create sheet metal could generate big energy savings in motorized machines.

Purdue University engineers are getting a $1.5 million federal grant to begin studying the new process and its applications this summer.

The three-year project will focus on adding larger amounts of silicon to the small steel parts that help power electric motors.

Silicon helps the steel waste less electricity, says Purdue materials engineer Kevin Trumble, but adding enough to make a difference isn’t easy.

courtesy Purdue University

Purdue researchers are partnering with Microsoft and scientists at three other universities around the globe to determine whether they’ve found a way to create a stable form of what’s known as “quantum computing.”

A new five-year agreement aims to build a type of system that could perform computations that are currently impossible in a short timespan, even for supercomputers.

courtesy Purdue University

Purdue’s College of Engineering has hired a researcher renowned as something of a “whiz kid” to be its new dean.

Mung Chiang comes to Purdue from Princeton, where he’s taught electrical engineering and researched electronic communication methods.

Chiang turns 40 this year and has won several awards given to young engineering researchers. But he says he’s not focusing on how much time he’s spent in the field.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Purdue University students trying to validate a plan from entrepreneur Elon Musk say Musk’s idea to send a million people to Mars over the next century likely won’t work out.

The aeronautical and astronautical engineering students announced their findings Tuesday to former astronaut Buzz Aldrin and his son Andrew, who’d served as “customers” for the project.

Purdue University / http://www.purdue.edu/uns/html3month/2005/051012.Celebrate.cancer.html

Last year Indiana schools and businesses received more than $225 million for scientific and medical studies from the National Institutes of Health, or NIH. President Donald Trump’s proposed budget, released Thursday, cuts close to one-fifth of NIH funding, and this could significantly reduce the amount of research done at the state’s universities.

Alex Wild / http://www.myrmecos.neT

New research from Indiana University scientists shines a light on what makes certain insects male or female. The study, published Monday in the journal Nature Communications, examined what happened when researchers suppressed the so-called “doublesex” master gene, which assigns traits to different sexes of the same species.

courtesy NASA

The last man to walk on the moon – NASA astronaut and Purdue University graduate Gene Cernan -- has died.

Cernan became the answer to a trivia question when he was the last human to leave his footprints on the lunar surface as part of the Apollo 17 crew in 1972.

But historian John Norberg, who’s written about Purdue’s connections to the space race, says Cernan wouldn’t want today’s students to think of him that way.

Eduardo Zattara/Armin Moczek/Jim Powers/Jonathan Cherry/Matthew Curtis / Indiana University

Biologists studying dung beetles at Indiana University have won an award celebrating a 3-D image illustrating their work.

The researchers' winning picture displays the metamorphosis of an adolescent beetle’s nervous system.

Three scientists were behind the colorful, award-winning image, which last month was declared a winner in the Federation for American Societies for Experimental Biology’s BioArt competition.

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