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Matthew G. / https://www.flickr.com/photos/streetmatt/

Millions of news consumers who get their information through social media are more likely to be trapped in a social bubble, says a study from the Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing.

Researchers studied more than 100 million web clicks and 1.3 billion social media posts from 2006 to 2010, and they found social media news consumers get their information from a less diverse range fo sources versus those who get their news through search engines. 

Snowy Owls Return To The Hoosier State

Dec 30, 2015
Stephan Rinke / https://www.flickr.com/photos/stephanrinke/

Two years ago, the northern U.S. saw one of the largest migration populations of snowy owls on record. Although the numbers have slightly declined since that record migration in 2013, snowy owls have been spotted in Indiana again this year.

Snowy owls travel as far south as central Indiana as part of their annual migration. Interpretive Naturalist Brad Bumgardner from the Indiana Dunes State Park says that this year, snowy owls have been spotted along the Indiana lakeshore.

jimmedia / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimmediaart/

A Purdue University meteorology professor says El Niño conditions in the Pacific Ocean won’t necessarily lead to a warmer, dryer winter in Indiana.

Jill Coleman says that isn't to say Indiana won’t see warmer temperatures and less snow, but she notes Indiana is hard to forecast because it is affected by conditions from both ends of the country.

Rob George / https://furmangreenscene.wordpress.com/

Leaders of an effort to repatriate an endangered salamander to Indiana's Blue River say they're ready for the next step -- attempting to make the state's waterways habitable to the animals once again. 

While area conservationists' educational materials frequently paint the hellbender as a cute, smiling cartoon amphibian, the real deal is less adorable but arguably more intriguing.

EAB stump
Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA

Good news for tree huggers in Indiana—experts say while tree deaths caused by the invasive Emerald Ash Borer are at their peak, it’s likely the number of infestations will decline in the next few years.

For the past decade, the little beetle has been a big problem for the country’s trees. The ash borer burrows into a tree’s trunk, destroying the tissues and pathways that carry nutrients.

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