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Psycho Delia / https://www.flickr.com/photos/24557420@N05/

Indianapolis is enlisting its residents to help count bees, butterflies and other bugs as part of a crowdsourcing science initiative. The “City-Wide Pollinator Count” aims to tell scientists more about where the bees are…and aren’t.

Crowdsourcing data has proved a valuable tool for scientists. Initiatives such as the Great World Wide Star Count and Cornell Ornithology Lab’s Backyard Bird Count catalog information scientists would otherwise never be able to access.

Bertram Nudelbach / https://www.flickr.com/photos/nudelbach/

Indiana will witness its first real heat wave of 2016 this week. Temperatures are expected to peak in the mid-90s this weekend, and the National Weather Service has issued a heat advisory through Saturday evening.

The hot conditions are the result of a so-called “heat dome,” which is exactly what it sounds like. Even though the name is simple, the conditions that create a heat dome are a complicated combination of pressure, temperature and air density.

Courtesy H. Kory Cooper

Research from a Purdue anthropology professor has uncovered the first evidence of prehistoric metal trade between Asia and North America.

Anthropology professor and metallurgy expert H. Kory Cooper analyzed two objects uncovered in northern Alaska. The two tiny artifacts—a buckle and a small bead—are made of bronze. That’s important because bronze doesn’t occur in nature--it’s an alloy.

By looking at how such alloys are mixed, anthropologists can pinpoint metals age and where they’re from.

NASA / http://news.indiana.edu/releases/iu/2016/05/low-metal-galaxy.shtml

Astronauts traveling at the speed of light would still take 30 years to reach AGC 198691, otherwise known as Leoncino, the "little lion" galaxy. Once arrived, they would find a cluster of stars described by scientists as "pristine," an intergalactic time capsule.

For some reason, the small, faint Leoncino contains the smallest amounts of metals in any galaxy ever discovered, a characteristic Indiana University astronomers say could offer scientists insight into theories about the Big Bang.

The findings appear this month in the Astrophysical Journal.

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

It’s a Friday morning at IUPUI, and about 20 middle-school kids are seated in the front of a second-floor classroom. They’re dressed up in their Sunday best—dresses, polos with starched collars—it’s a big day for them. Near the back of the room, parents outnumber the chairs two-to-one; many end up sitting on the floor.

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory / http://www-d0.fnal.gov/Run2Physics/WWW/results/final/B/B16A/

Physicists around the world were thrilled last month when news broke about a new type of subatomic particle—the so-called “tetraquark”, an unheard-of arrangement of four different types of quarks.

But last week, scientists at the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, Switzerland, looked at their own data, and they’ve said they’ve tried and failed to find concurring evidence.

Fermilab / http://news.fnal.gov/2016/02/dzero-discovers-a-new-particle-consistent-with-a-tetraquark

Research by group of scientists led in part by an Indiana University physicist has resulted in a detection of a new kind of subatomic particle—a so-called “tetraquark.”

Quarks are among the teeniest, tiniest building blocks of matter. When quarks combine, they create protons, neutrons and other particles which make up molecules, and so on.

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

A lot of places have claimed to be the so-called “Shrimp capital of the world,” including Brunswick, Georgia, Morgan City, Louisiana, and, most recently, Mazatlán, Mexico.

More than 2000 miles north of Mazatlán, though, shrimp farmers in Indiana are working to add the Hoosier State to that list. The state is home to a growing number of what are known as “inland shrimp farms.”

Matthew G. / https://www.flickr.com/photos/streetmatt/

Millions of news consumers who get their information through social media are more likely to be trapped in a social bubble, says a study from the Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing.

Researchers studied more than 100 million web clicks and 1.3 billion social media posts from 2006 to 2010, and they found social media news consumers get their information from a less diverse range fo sources versus those who get their news through search engines. 

Snowy Owls Return To The Hoosier State

Dec 30, 2015
Stephan Rinke / https://www.flickr.com/photos/stephanrinke/

Two years ago, the northern U.S. saw one of the largest migration populations of snowy owls on record. Although the numbers have slightly declined since that record migration in 2013, snowy owls have been spotted in Indiana again this year.

Snowy owls travel as far south as central Indiana as part of their annual migration. Interpretive Naturalist Brad Bumgardner from the Indiana Dunes State Park says that this year, snowy owls have been spotted along the Indiana lakeshore.

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