road funding

Robert Carr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/myconstructionphotos/1525875787/

Nearly 3,000 highway engineers and contractors are on the Purdue campus to learn the latest innovations in building cost-effective, long-lasting roads, highways and bridges.

But, before the technical workshops about pavement preservation and culvert installation began Tuesday, attendees heard from one of the men who is determining how to generate the more than $1 billion additional dollars needed in each of the next 20 years to shore up the state’s crumbling roads and bridges.  

State, Local Split Of Road Money Unlikely To Change

Mar 3, 2017

 

Nearly 90 percent of Indiana’s roads are maintained by counties, cities and towns, yet those local units get less than half of the state’s primary road funding dollars.

And that’s unlikely to change in this session’s road funding plan.

House Approves Tax-Raising Road Funding Bill

Feb 16, 2017

 

The House approved comprehensive road funding legislation that raises fuel taxes and opens the door to tolling Indiana interstate highways.

House Speaker Brian Bosma (R-Indianapolis) says the House GOP’s road funding plan follows a simple philosophy: the user pays.

“And those that use the asset more, pay more. Those who use the asset less, pay less,” Bosma says.

House Democrats Unveil Road Funding Plan

Feb 6, 2017


House Democrats unveiled their road funding plan, billing it “No New Taxes.”

The House Republican roads plan uses fuel tax increases, new fees and tolling.

Holcomb: "The State Of Our State Is Sound"

Jan 17, 2017

 

 

 

Gov. Eric Holcomb used his State of the State address to make another pitch for creating a long-term, sustainable road funding plan. But he also continues to avoid specifics on how to pay for that plan.

Legislative leaders have said they want the governor to be a strong voice for the tax increases that are likely to be part of the road funding plan. Holcomb only says that if the state asks Hoosiers to invest more in their infrastructure, the return will be worth it.

House GOP Rolls Out Road Funding Plan

Jan 4, 2017

 

House Republicans unveiled their road funding proposal and the proposed first steps would cover less than half of the state’s needs.

House Speaker Brian Bosma says Indiana needs an average of about $1.2 billion a year over the next 20 years for its roads. His caucus’ plan would immediately raise all fuel taxes by 10 cents to begin working toward that goal. Bosma says the House GOP plan would also create a new $15 annual fee on all vehicles.

“So, adding the registration fee and the gas tax – for the average Hoosier, $5 per month,” Bosma says.

City of Frankfort

On a day with a sub-zero wind chill factor, a frigid breeze is a topic for discussion.

But in Frankfort today, it could be the wind itself that gets the cold shoulder at a meeting deciding the future of alternative energy in Clinton County.

Lee Coursey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/leeco/

A debate over a specific way to generate transportation funding dollars resurfaced during the third meeting of the state roads task on Thursday.

The discussion focused on funding sources. And an idea promoted by a Purdue expert testifying before the panel provoked debate among its members: specifically, the value of vehicle miles traveled, or VMT, fees.

In a VMT system, people pay for how many miles they drive.

Republican Sen. Brandt Hershman, (R-Buck Creek), says he has issues with using that type of fee to pay for roads.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

 While many Central Indiana towns are using Community Crossings for paving projects in traffic-heavy areas, one is using the money as a stepping stone to revamp an entire section that’s become somewhat of a horror attraction.

Battle Ground Town Council president Steve Egly says the damage to Northgate Drive is environmental. But that’s not why people avoid it.

There is only one property on the several grassy lots – an abandoned Days Inn, which he says is scaring both commuters and property owners away from the area.

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

State officials are taking the road funding debate outside the statehouse, to rural locations across the state.

The meetings between the Department of Transportation and Indiana Farm Bureau are a chance for rural residents to speak up about their infrastructure needs.

Larry Pullam was one such resident at a recent meeting in Crawfordsville. He's a retired corn and soybean farmer from Hendricks County, and says he never felt like he had a voice in the infrastructure conversation before the meeting.

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