RFRA

Lawsuit Challenging RFRA 'Fix' Moves Forward

Nov 17, 2016

 

A lawsuit challenging local LGBT ordinances and the so-called “fix” to Indiana’s controversial religious freedom law will move forward after a judge denied motions to dismiss the case.

Conservative religious groups the American Family Association of Indiana, the Indiana Family Institute and its political arm are challenging anti-discrimination ordinances in Carmel, Indianapolis, Bloomington and Columbus.

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

 At a Purdue-hosted forum Monday night, Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson spoke to hundreds of questioning students who wanted to know what it could mean to have a Libertarian president.

Johnson focused many of his remarks on giving power to the states instead of the federal government.

The former Republican governor of New Mexico says he pushed for school choice and voucher systems in his state. If elected president, he says he’d eradicate what he calls the Department of Education’s way of solving problems.  

Kate Ter Haar / https://www.flickr.com/photos/katerha/

The NCAA is now factoring host cities’ anti-discrimination policies into its decisions about where sporting events are held.

At its quarterly meeting this week, the Indianapolis-based college sports organization said it will now take into account whether a city can provide an environment free of discrimination based on race, religion, sexual orientation and gender identity.

The new metric affects the bidding process for mens’ and womens’ sporting events in all divisions as well as educational and leadership events and conferences.

Gretchen Frazee / http://indianapublicmedia.org/news/

The abrupt death of legislation aimed at balancing religious freedom with gay, lesbian and bisexual civil rights left many civil rights advocates surprised, disappointed and pointing fingers as they sought to assign blame.

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Drew Daudelin reports that finger-pointing could have a ripple effect on this year’s elections as people on all sides of the issue begin looking ahead to the May primary and November general elections.

Conservative Groups Hope To Use RFRA To Quash Four Cities' LGBT Protections

Feb 3, 2016
Joseph Hren / WFIU

Four Indiana cities are facing a lawsuit challenging LGBT protections in their human rights ordinances.

The complaint alleges the local laws in Bloomington, Columbus, Indianapolis and Carmel violate the Religious Freedom Restoration Act lawmakers passed last year.

Columbus Mayor Jim Lienhoop says the city stands behind its human rights ordinance.  

“The people that are suing us, they didn’t tell us, they told the newspaper, so I think it gives you a little bit of insight of what their motives are, but nonetheless, we intend to defend ourselves,” Lienhoop says.

Brandon Smith / http://www.ipbs.org/

The Indiana Senate killed a bill Tuesday that would have protected lesbian, gay, and bisexual Hoosiers from discrimination.

The final version of the bill did not protect the transgender community. 

The proposed measure had 27 potential amendments filed on the Senate floor. 

But none of them were publicly discussed after Senate Republican leadership opted not to call the bill to the floor for a vote.

Jim Nix / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimnix/5039079018

The Senate is expected to vote Tuesday on whether to add transgendered Hoosiers to a gay-rights bill.

Democrats and gay-rights groups have opposed Senate Republicans' civil rights bill because it pushes the question of transgender protections to a study committee.

The bill's supporters have argued more debate is needed about transgender rights.

But Sen. Ron Alting (R-Lafayette) has filed an amendment to add gender identity to the bill.

Gay-Straight Alliances / Facebook

For the second straight session, lawmakers are discussing the balance between religious liberty and protections for LGBT Hoosiers. There are a number of bills circulating and young members of the LGBT community are trying to figure out if their lives will improve if any of the so-called fixes are implemented.

“Sometimes people just hear what you’re yelling and they don’t listen.”

“And it makes me think I’ve taken it for granted.”

“It really can be a terrifying thing for us and it means a lot to us and our identity.”

Gretchen Frazee / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Advocates on either side of the religious liberty/LGBT rights debate at the Statehouse say they’re not surprised a bill aiming to rewrite last year’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act died Wednesday without even receiving a vote. 

The proposed bill would’ve labeled certain constitutional rights – including freedoms of religion, speech, thought, and assembly – as “fundamental” and required judges to give deference to them. 

LGBT rights group Freedom Indiana opposed the bill, arguing it threatened to promote discrimination against the LGBT community. 

David and Ruth S / https://www.flickr.com/photos/existdifferently/8399061

An Indianapolis tourism group says the fallout from last year's debate over the Religious Freedom Restoration Act cost the city at least $60 million.

And Visit Indy officials worry the economic impact will be long-lasting.

At least a dozen conventions cited RFRA as a reason for not choosing Indianapolis as a host city on Visit Indy’s annual survey.

Republican lawmakers have claimed the fix they passed last year would repair any damage done by the controversy.

But Visit Indy Vice President Chris Gahl says that remains to be seen.

Pages