Purdue University

Tom Campbell / Purdue University

A new study from Purdue University finds honeybees are exposed to far more pesticides than previously thought.

Most research on pesticide use and honeybees focus on neonicotinoids, an insecticide applied to corn and soybean crops that’s harmful to bees.

But Purdue entomology professor Christian Krupke wanted to know what happens to bees when they’re not feeding on crop pollen.

From https://www.facebook.com/MetropolisQuartet

WBAA's John Clare recently spoke with Deb Stevenson, oboist with the Metropolis Quartet, about their next performance, Saturday, May 7th at 7:30 pm at the Delphi Opera House. They discussed the program, chamber music, and Deb's amazing connection to Purdue University!

Learn more about the concert here.

Chris Morisse Vizza

For a second time in 17 years, students from Tippecanoe County have traveled to the statehouse to advocate for a bill designating Say's Firefly as the state insect.

And, for a second time in as many years, the General Assembly elected to not take action on the bill.

The firefly activists, second- and third-graders at West Lafayette's Cumberland Elementary School, plan to shine a light on the topic until state lawmakers see things their way.

Purdue, Rolls-Royce Partner Up For $33-Million Project

Apr 14, 2016
Rolls-Royce / http://www.rolls-royce.com/products-and-services/civil-aerospace/products/civil-large-engines.aspx

Rolls-Royce is expanding its engine research presence at Purdue. The two are partnering on a $33 million upgrade of Rolls' lab in the Purdue Research Park.

Indianapolis Research and Development head Lisa Teague says the company will use the upgrade to work on building more efficient jet engines. With the millions of miles planes fly, even a 1 percent improvement in efficiency could cut fuel costs significantly.

The company is also studying ways to manage the hotter temperatures that accompany efficiency improvements.

West Point-The U.S. Military Academy / https://www.flickr.com/photos/west_point/

Purdue University is the latest school to offer free mumps vaccines to help combat the spread of a campus outbreak of the highly contagious virus

Four people at Purdue came down with the virus this week, bringing the total number of confirmed cases on Indiana college campuses to 50.

Mumps is of particular concern for schools this time of year, says Tippecanoe County Health Department Administrator Craig Rich. Events such as Little 500 and Purdue’s Grand Prix mean a higher likelihood the virus could be passed between schools.

TheoJunior / https://www.flickr.com/photos/theojunior/

Purdue University announced Wednesday the school is investigating five probable cases of the mumps virus on its West Lafayette campus.

The school joins three other schools playing host to mumps outbreaks so far this year.

State health department data says the largest mumps outbreaks have occurred at Indiana University and Butler University, who have reported 17 and 24 confirmed cases, respectively.

Purdue Researchers: Sponges Can Soak Up Contaminants

Apr 5, 2016
Justin Weibel / Purdue University

Purdue University researchers have found a way to separate oil and other contaminants from water using materials you can find around the house. The discovery may lead to way to clean up environmental spills.

The scientists take melamine sponges similar to those found in cleaning pads or insulation then dip them into a solution of silicone rubber and hexane solvent. That creates a thin coating that repels water, and at the same time allows the sponges to absorb materials like oil, hydrocarbons, PCBs and some pesticides.

State Street Team Finds Money To Expand Project

Mar 11, 2016
The State Street Project / http://statestreetwl.com/

Members of the team overseeing reconstruction of West Lafayette’s State Street say they’ve found several million dollars in savings that will allow them to expand the scope of the project.

Oren Darling / Purdue Research Foundation

Editor's note (3-1-2016) : The German company that licensed the product in this story has changed its name from BARDOT to BEAM. 

A Purdue-created pathogen-screening device, which forgoes traditional microscopes and stains in favor of laser scanning, has been licensed by a German biomedical tech company

The device has a glamorous name—scientists call it BARDOT—short for Bacteria Rapid Detection Using Optical Scattering Technology.

The State Street Project / http://statestreetwl.com/

With the broad strokes of West Lafayette and Purdue University’s State Street Project settled, residents Thursday night delved into the nitty-gritty details of the Plenary Roads plan for the project.

Each of the approximately one-dozen speakers at a public hearing was largely complimentary of the plan.

However, one of the few areas of disagreement was the plan’s suggestion to convert many one-way roads into two-way streets.

Purdue Fire Chief Kevin Ply, though, calls the measure a win for public safety.

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