Purdue Polytechnic High School

Jae Lee / WBAA News

For much of the last week, students have been camped out in Purdue University’s administration building, hoping for a meeting with President Mitch Daniels.

They’ve got demands about how the school handles diversity that they want met before they leave. But it’s unclear whether the president will see them.

On this edition of WBAA’s Monthly Conversation with Mitch Daniels, we ask if their demands are reasonable and we hear what steps the president is definitely NOT willing to take.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

When he was done with his two terms as governor, Mitch Daniels received a number of job offers – some more lucrative than being Purdue’s president.

When he got into his current job, he asked for some of his pay to be “at risk” – that is, for him only to get it if he meets certain benchmarks.

On this edition of WBAA’s Monthly Conversation with Mitch Daniels, though, we drill down on that number.

It had previously been reported that 50-percent of his pay is “at risk." As we learn on this month’s show, it’s actually far less than that which he stands to lose.

Eric Weddle/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Purdue University officials joined Indianapolis school and city leaders Monday to launch a new STEM-focused charter high school set to open next year.

It’s a unique curriculum where graduates who meet Purdue's admission requirements will be a top choice for enrollment.

But as Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Eric Weddle reports, some worry the school could be a drain on the Indianapolis Public Schools District.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

Next year, Purdue opens its Polytechnic High School in Indianapolis. It’ll work within the Indianapolis Public Schools, but also be a competitor in some ways.

And it’ll offer something no other high school in Indiana does – direct admission to a university upon graduation.

So as more and more schools advertise to lure students away from their competitors, does Purdue have an unfair advantage?

We pose that question to Mitch Daniels on this month’s conversation with him.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

As he completed his final meeting as chair of the University Senate, Purdue professor Kirk Alter chided Provost Deba Dutta and administrators who sit in the Senate for acting on their own behalf, but under the guise of representing the rank-and-file in their departments.

On this Monthly Conversation with Mitch Daniels, we ask Purdue’s president if the line has become too blurred between faculty and staff and whether those administrators are wolves in sheep's clothing.