Purdue Agricultural Economics

A U.S. Department of Commerce document lists Purdue University research as a source for recommending a 24 percent tariff on imported steel.

When Purdue agricultural economics professor Thomas Hertel first saw the Trump Administration’s math, he had to check for himself.

“We quickly re-ran that experiment here and we get the same outcome,” says Hertel.

He created the Global Trade Analysis Project Model, referred to as GTAP, 25 years ago. The free database runs analyses on the impacts of tariffs and today has more than 17,000 users in 170 countries.

Jennifer C. / flickr.com/photos/29638108@N06/7713775530

A Purdue University study has found a popular type of pesticide – found across nearly half the state -- can be lethal to honeybees. But a leading producer of the chemicals is striking back against those claims.

Neonicotinoid insecticides are used in planting corn crops, and the study says more than 94-percent of honey bees are at risk of exposure in the state.

 

A new study from Purdue University on the effects of the state’s new method for taxing farmland shows what rural areas will take the biggest hit from the change.

Indiana taxes farmland mainly on the value of crops the soil can produce. But that calculation has lagged behind the current crop market.

It based farmland property assessments on 4-year-old crop prices, meaning taxes climbed even as farm revenues began to decline.

 

Generations of farmers, agronomists, lawmakers and other alumni of Purdue’s College of Agriculture met for their annual Fish Fry, amid a lot of political and economic uncertainty for the farm industry.

That fact wasn’t lost on the hundreds of Purdue agriculture alumni who flocked to the Indiana State Fairgrounds Saturday.

Most of them rely on farm exports to Mexico, China and other countries where President Donald Trump has pledged to reform trade deals. And Indiana Agriculture Secretary Ted McKinney says it’s on people’s minds.

Sylvia Bao / http://indianapublicmedia.org/news/

The value of Indiana farmland is seeing its biggest decline since the 1980s.

That's according to Purdue University's annual Farmland Value Survey, which says the drop is mainly due to low grain prices.

Indiana farmland values have been falling since 2014, but the estimated decline this year is especially steep -- around 8.5 percent statewide, putting the cost of an average acre of land at a little over $7000.

the Indiana Insider Blog / VisitIndiana.com

Indiana is the fifth-largest pork producing state in the nation as measured in sales, producing $1.3 billion worth of pork annually. Pork tenderloins are considered by many to be the unofficial Hoosier state food. So this week’s much-talked-about report showing a link between processed meats and cancer could strike fear into the hearts of pork producers. Except...it's not.

Purdue Agricultural Economics professor Jim Mintert says one report probably isn’t going to affect consumer attitudes toward processed meats. But depending on what happens in the future, that might change.