public-private partnership

Purdue University will help train thousands of new Infosys employees in Indiana and nationwide.

The five-year agreement comes as the technology and consulting company readies a new hub in Indianapolis.

For years, Infosys hired mainly visa workers from overseas. The company said in May it’s shifting course, hiring 10,000 American employees – including 2,000 in Indiana.

The Indiana University School of Medicine is getting $25 million from the Lilly Endowment to recruit new scientists to Indiana, and to pair them up directly with big Indiana companies.

Medical school research dean Anantha Shekhar says it aims to fast-track the creation of treatments from discoveries about cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and more.

He says new technologies like gene sequencing are facilitating those applications faster than ever.

Purdue University is seeing more research funding from its corporate partners, a trend that has officials hoping they can be less reliant on public funding.

Purdue gets about a quarter of its research funding from the private sector. An average of 500 companies chip in every year.

But the school’s corporate and global partnerships officer, Dan Hirleman, says the funds those companies contribute have increased from $37 million in 2013 to as much as $55 million the past few years.

City of Lafayette

Quite a number of cities have prominent riverwalks like the one Lafayette is trying to construct.

But Lafayette’s will be built in partnership between the city, a quasi-public group concerned with the river and a private real estate group.

So how does such a project get done with some many groups providing input?

We address that this week with Tony Roswarski on Ask The Mayor.

Also on this week’s show, questions from listeners about whether the paint used in public murals is safe, the writing on fire trucks and how to allow more chickens in urban backyards.

City of West Lafayette

As the winning bid for West Lafayette’s State Street overhaul is set to be announced, the city’s Redevelopment Commission is expressing its displeasure with the process.

In a largely symbolic 3-2 vote Wednesday, the Commission decried what it sees as a lack of transparency in the so-called “build-operate-transfer” process.

City Attorney Eric Burns tried to assuage the concerns of Board Chair Larry Oates, but Oates pounded on his desk and insisted on trying to slow down the Joint Board overseeing the project.