Pharmaceuticals

At Indianapolis-based pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly, 2,300 employees will take buyouts as part of the company’s effort to save money by cutting at least 2,000 jobs in the U.S. by the end of the year.

It’s unclear whether layoffs are still in the works in the Hoosier state.

Lilly said in September it would aim to save $500 million by cutting 3,500 jobs out of its more than 41,000 worldwide, with at least 2,000 cut in the U.S.

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Peter Balonon-Rosen/IPBS

This week, Side Effects Public Media released a report detailing how the president of an Indiana nonprofit is also lobbying for a drug company, Alkermes. The story, produced in collaboration with WFYI and NPR, has some political leaders in Indiana calling for stricter disclosure rules for lobbyists trying to influence policy. 

 

Eli Lilly / https://www.lilly.com/newsroom

Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly has been dealt another blow by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which failed to approve a newly-developed treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

In what is referred to as a “complete response letter,” The FDA stated it wants Lilly to supply more data to clarify safes dosage levels and put certain safety concerns to rest.

Raymond Gilford / https://www.flickr.com/photos/shuttercat7/

Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly, along with two other European pharmaceutical companies, is facing a price-fixing lawsuit regarding its rapidly escalating insulin prices. Lilly makes a form of insulin called Humalog, whose list price has doubled since 2011, the lawsuit claims.

In a complaint filed in federal court Monday, the plaintiffs argue the price increase isn’t due to increased production costs but rather the exploitation of a complex system of pricing deals between insurers, manufacturers and middlemen known as pharmacy benefit managers, or PBMs.

Paul Sableman / https://www.flickr.com/photos/pasa/

After a promising Alzheimer’s drug failed a late-stage clinical trial, pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly has announced it will be laying off workers around the country.

The news of layoffs follows last month’s announcement concerning the failure of Solanezumab, which Lilly hoped would be the first drug to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Global Panorama / https://www.flickr.com/photos/121483302@N02/

A $6 billion healthcare bill making its way through Congress could have significant effects on health, industry and research in the Hoosier State.

The 21st Century Cures Act was approved by a wide majority in the House Wednesday. It offers up nearly $5 billion in research spending through the National Institutes of Health, which funnels the cash to schools such as Purdue and Indiana University.

Global Panorama / https://www.flickr.com/photos/121483302@N02/

Two congressmen are calling on the federal Justice Department to investigate drug companies—including Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly—for possible price fixing of insulin products.

In a letter, Vermont senator Bernie Sanders and Maryland representative Elijah Cummings criticize three insulin manufacturers for skyrocketing insulin prices. The letter alleges the prices have been raised in tandem with each other, indicating potential collusion.

Indianapolis-based pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly will have a new CEO in January.

Lilly's retiring chief, John Lechleiter, led the company to new prosperity during his eight-year tenure.

 

His replacement, David Ricks, will have the challenge of keeping that going, according to experts like Indiana University corporate leadership professor Ken Wendeln.

 

Craig Zirpolo

Thanks to new laws lifting restrictions on the availability of naloxone, the overdose-intervention drug is now easier to find than ever before. But the drug’s skyrocketing price means certain public health agencies are having to hustle to keep it on the shelves.

Bureau of Economic Analysis / U.S. Department of Commerce

Indiana led all the other states in GDP growth for the fourth quarter of 2015.

The state’s gross domestic product rose 3 percent – with manufacturing and agriculture driving most of that increase.

 

The GDP measures how much was spent on goods and services produced in-state. Indiana’s late-2015 increase from $338.7 million to $341.2 million in GDP was top in the nation, with neighboring Ohio coming in second.

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