opioid addiction

Bill Adds Opioid Treatment Options

Mar 15, 2018
Rep. Cindy Kirchhofer presents HEA 1017 to the House. (Photo courtesy of Kirchhofer's office)
Jill Sheridan

Indiana lawmakers passed a bill to expand the number of opioid treatment centers in the state.  It adds nine centers that will be located at existing hospitals. Each will need approval from the state.  

Rep. Cindy Kirchhoffer (R-Beech Grove) authored the legislation to improve access to addiction treatment – especially for people in rural areas. 

Photo courtesy of the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention

New numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show Indiana has a significant increase in overdoses cases.

The report examines the most recent data on overdoses at emergency departments. Indiana experienced a 35 percent increase in visits a trend that Indianapolis EMS medical director Dan O’Donnell says isn’t surprising.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

By the slimmest of margins, Tippecanoe County’s needle exchange program will survive for at least one more year.

A 2-1 vote by the county commissioners Monday came down only after Commissioner David Byers – who’d declined for weeks to state his stance publicly – voted in favor of a continuance.

Byers says he was swayed by talking to other commissioners at a recent state conference and by listening closely to public comment at Monday’s meeting from those who are unhappy about the exchange operating in a residential neighborhood in Lafayette.

Indiana will receive more than $3.5 million in federal funds to tackle the opioid epidemic. The money going to 21 health centers, will primarily be used to increase behavioral health services.

The Health Resources and Services Administration, or HRSA, will disperse more than $200 million in grants to qualifying health centers around the country that serve patients regardless of ability to pay.

Indianapolis’s Raphel Health Center CEO Dee Roudebush says the funding comes just in time.

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Jake Harper

More people who are addicted to opioids are coming into the Marion County Jail, according to the sheriff’s office. The influx has the sheriff calling on Indiana lawmakers to spend more to combat addiction.   

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Department of Foreign Affairs / https://www.flickr.com/photos/dfataustralianaid/

Indiana’s Medicaid will soon cover methadone treatment for people suffering from opioid addiction. That could mean more people seeking treatment, and savings for people already receiving it.