NPR World News

Parallels
3:13 pm
Tue May 5, 2015

London's Dominance Becomes A British Election Issue

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 7:32 pm

Nearly every country in the world has its major hub city, often the capital, with smaller cities feeding into it. The United Kingdom takes this structure to a whole new level. London is one of the richest cities in the world, and its population is the size of the next six British cities combined.

A global hub, London completely dominates the political, cultural and economic life of the U.K. to an extent rarely seen elsewhere. The U.K. has struggled with this imbalance for decades. This Thursday's election is highlighting the divide.

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The Two-Way
1:53 pm
Mon May 4, 2015

'Charlie Hebdo' Staffer Pushes Back Against Writers' Opposition To Award

Jean-Baptiste Thoret, Charlie Hebdo's film critic, speaks at a news conference in Washington on May 1. Thoret will receive, on behalf of Charlie Hebdo, the PEN American Center's Freedom of Expression Courage Award in New York on Tuesday.
Andrew Caballero-Reynolds AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 5, 2015 2:02 am

We've been telling you about the opposition from some writers to the decision by the PEN American Center to give Charlie Hebdo its Freedom of Expression Courage Award. The satirical French publication was targeted by Islamist militants Jan. 7 apparently for its cartoons of Islam's Prophet Muhammad. The attack killed 12 people.

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Asia
9:17 am
Sun May 3, 2015

To Restore Its Shattered Treasures, Nepal Has A Secret Weapon

Master carvers like Ratna Muni Brahmacharya are in a position to play a key role in restoring Nepal's many damaged temples and monuments.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Mon May 4, 2015 2:09 pm

Blue-uniformed police do the heavy lifting in Dubar square in the city of Patan, one of Nepal's oldest. Moving wooden beams and stacking broken bricks, they sift through ruined monuments, some of which date back four centuries and more.

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Parallels
7:59 am
Sat May 2, 2015

In Danang, Where U.S. Troops First Landed, Memories Of War Have Faded

Members of the 9th U.S. Marine Expeditionary Force go ashore at Danang, South Vietnam, on March 8, 1965. Assigned to beef up defense of an air base, they were the first U.S. combat troops deployed in the Vietnam War.
AP

Originally published on Sat May 2, 2015 5:38 pm

The first American combat troops to arrive in Vietnam landed in the coastal city of Danang 50 years ago this past March. The 2,000 Marines had the job of protecting the nearby U.S. air base.

It took the members of the 9th Marine Expeditionary Brigade almost an entire day to bring their men and materiel ashore that day in March 1965. Nguyen Tien knows, because he was there.

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Goats and Soda
7:20 pm
Fri May 1, 2015

Show Us The Aid: Anger In An Ancient Nepali Town

A grandmother and her grandson sit on the belongings that they have salvaged from their collapsed homes on April 29, 2015 in Bhaktapur, Nepal.
Omar Havana Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 4, 2015 11:44 am

Where is the aid?

That's what the people of the ancient city of Bhaktapur want to know.

The historic gate to old Bhaktapur is about the only thing still standing after the earthquake. The ornate temples have crumbled. Brick homes were reduced to rubble. People have lost everything, including loved ones.

People are living under tarps or out in the open, without running water or toilets. Some 70 people are living in an improvised hut. Flies are everywhere. People say they haven't had any help from the outside — no medicine, no food.

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