NPR World News

Parallels
4:09 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

Syrian Rebels Want To Fight Assad, But Now They'll Face ISIS

Free Syrian Army fighters run behind sandbags in Daraa Al-Mahata, in southern Syria, on Jan. 21. Many moderate rebels joined the uprising to fight against President Bashar Assad, but the U.S. plans to train them to fight the self-proclaimed Islamic State.
Wsam Almokdad Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 7:45 pm

In the U.S. view, the most serious threat coming from Syria is the self-styled Islamic State, or ISIS. That's why the Pentagon is sending forces to train what it terms moderate Syrian rebel fighters.

But here's the catch. Moderate rebel commanders say it will be hard to explain this mission to their troops, who took up arms with the aim of toppling Syrian President Bashar Assad, not ISIS.

The U.S. plan calls for the Americans and their allies to train and equip about 5,000 Syrian moderates. U.S. troops are heading to Turkey, Qatar and Saudi Arabia for the training.

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The Record
1:09 pm
Mon January 26, 2015

From Prog-Rock Pioneer To Kitsch King: Remembering Demis Roussos

International pop star Demis Roussos hams it up for the camera at the Cannes Film Festival in May 1975. Roussos died in Athens Sunday at age 68.
Ralph Gatti AFP/Getty Images

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Music Interviews
8:00 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Dengue Fever: Retro Pop, Cambodian Style

Dengue Fever's latest album is The Deepest Lake.
Marc Walker/Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 10:47 am

The late 1960s and early '70s defined a vibrant, electrifying and psychedelic era for rock music everywhere — including Cambodia. The Khmer Rouge communist movement put an end to that when it took power in 1975, but the music from that era has been discovered and rediscovered over the years.

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Parallels
8:00 am
Sun January 25, 2015

Piece By Piece, Monks Scramble To Preserve Iraq's Christian History

Father Najeeb Michaeel shows off one of the many Christian manuscripts he saved from Iraq's Christian libraries.
Alice Fordham NPR

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 2:40 pm

In an unfinished building in the northern Iraqi city of Erbil, displaced Christian children sing a little song about returning to their village. "We're going back," they sing, "to our houses, our land, our church."

Right now, they're living in an open concrete structure. The self-styled Islamic State, or ISIS, took over their home village of Qaraqosh, and the Christians fled in fear, on foot.

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Music News
8:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

In Modern Klezmer, 'The Oldest Old Guy' Is The King Of The Scene

Pete Sokolow (center) and his bandmates in Tarras Band, a group of younger musicians inspired by the work of 20th-century clarinetist Dave Tarras.
Michael Macioce Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 12:18 pm

During the the 1980s, when the traditional dance music of East European Jews known as klezmer was enjoying a revival, Pete Sokolow was called "the youngest of the old guys."

"Now I'm the oldest old guy," Sokolow says. "Most of the old guys are gone. Pincus is gone. Dave. Sidney is gone. All my old friends. I miss them."

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