NPR World News

Shots - Health News
5:25 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

The Ebola Outbreak 3 Weeks In: Dire But Not Hopeless

The new normal in Guinea is washing hands with a mixture of water and bleach--shown here at the border entrance of Buruntuma, in the Gabu area on Tuesday.
Tiago Petinga EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 9:06 am

Guinea is on high alert. At the international airport, travelers' temperatures are monitored for signs of infection. In the capital city of Conakry, people rarely shake hands and are advised to regularly wash their hands with bleach-diluted water.

This is what life is like nearly three weeks after an outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus.

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Africa
5:54 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Rwanda Honors Dead, Celebrates Progress, 20 Years After Genocide

Rwandan women hold candles during a night vigil and prayer for genocide victims at Amahoro stadium.
Simon Maina AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 8:46 am

After a minute of silence at noon, Monday's remembrance of the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide began with testimony from a survivor.

The screaming started soon after.

In the crowd of 30,000 gathered in Amahoro stadium in Kigali, the Rwandan capital, first this person then that began to wail and thrash. Men in yellow vests took them to a special room of mattresses in the stadium basement.

In general, Rwandan culture discourages such outward displays of grief. But not during this time of year, when traumatic flashbacks are common.

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Africa
5:23 pm
Sun April 6, 2014

How Abandonment In Rwandan Genocide Changed Peacekeepers' Role

Family photographs of some of those who died hang in a display in the Kigali Genocide Memorial Centre in Rwanda's capital on Saturday.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 6:50 pm

It's been 20 years since the Rwandan genocide, in which political ideology and ethnic hatred gave license to thousands of Hutus to kill Tutsi families. But ethnic ideology may not have unleashed the genocide if the international community had not stepped back and allowed it to happen.

One notorious episode of abandonment changed forever the role of the United Nations peacekeeper. Early in the morning of April 7, 1994, thousands of Tutsis began arriving at a school on the outskirts of the capital, Kigali, seeking the protection of Belgian soldiers stationed there for the U.N.

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Music Interviews
5:12 pm
Sat April 5, 2014

A Music Of Exile: Haiti During The Duvalier Years

Haiti Direct: Big Band, Mini Jazz & Twoubadou Sounds, 1960-1978
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 6:19 pm

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Africa
11:46 am
Sat April 5, 2014

'Hotel Rwanda' Manager: We've Failed To Learn From History

Paul Rusesabagina, who sheltered more than 1,000 people in his hotel during the Rwandan genocide, says the brutal violence in Syria, the Central African Republic and the Congo shows history repeats itself while people fail to learn from it.
Courtesy Hotel Rwanda Rusesabagina Foundation

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 1:38 pm

Paul Rusesabagina is a figure from history — a terrible history.

He was the manager of the Diplomat Hotel in Kigali, Rwanda, 20 years ago, when the genocide of Rwanda's Tutsi people began. More than 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus would be killed in just three months.

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Deceptive Cadence
8:17 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

A Time Capsule From A Soviet-Era Childhood

Music from the Suitcase: A Collection of Russian Miniatures
Corey Hayes Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 3:49 pm

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Afghanistan
8:21 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

A New Era? Afghan Presidential Hopefuls Court Women's Vote

An Afghan woman listens to presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani during a campaign rally in Kabul on March 9, International Women's Day. Women will play a greater role in choosing Afghanistan's next president than ever before.
David Gilkey NPR

On International Women's Day last month, Afghan presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani held a rally in Kabul attended by several thousand women. While they were all wearing headscarves, there was not a full-length burqa to be seen in the crowd. And the Western-educated Ghani did something highly unusual in Afghanistan: He let his wife, Rula, a Lebanese-American Christian, address the crowd.

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World Cafe
2:00 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Tinariwen On World Cafe

Tinariwen.
Marie Planeille Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 3:54 pm

Today's episode of World Cafe features a couple of sparse, dry, angular and beautiful songs, performed live by the band Tinariwen. The group, made up of musicians from the Tuareg tribespeople of Northern Mali, has been making music together since 1979. Known for long, trance-inducing concert performances, the band has become increasingly revered in the West. Tinariwen's 2012 album Tassili even won a Grammy.

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Shots - Health News
7:05 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Why Is Guinea's Ebola Outbreak So Unusual?

A nurse of the 'Doctors without Borders' medical aid organisation examines a patient in the in-take area at a center for victims of the Ebola virus in Guekedou, on April 1, 2014. The viral haemorrhagic fever epidemic raging in Guinea is caused by several viruses which have similar symptoms — the deadliest and most feared of which is Ebola.
Seyllou AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:56 am

Doctors Without Borders has called the current outbreak of the Ebola virus in Guinea "unprecedented" — not because of the number of victims (so far at least 78 have died) but because the disease has traveled to various parts of the country.

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Music Lists
5:07 pm
Mon March 31, 2014

Latitudes: International Music You Must Hear Now

Sudanese singer Alsarah.
Jennifer Pritheeva Samuel Courtesy of the artist

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