NPR Political Coverage

With two contests down and the South Carolina primary only a week away, the six remaining Republican candidates took the debate stage Saturday night.

The debate, hosted by CBS News, featured lots of sparring between Donald Trump, Jeb Bush and Ted Cruz. Who spoke the longest? As always, NPR had its stopwatch at the ready.

President Obama struck a somber tone, remembering the late-Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia as a "towering legal mind" who influenced a generation, but made it clear, he intends to replace him.

"I plan to fulfill my constitutional obligation to appoint a successor — in due time," Obama said, adding that he expected a fair hearing and a timely vote.

South Carolina is known for its rough and tumble politics, and Saturday night's CBS News debate in Greenville, S.C., certainly held true to that characterization.

It was the most viscous and unruly debate yet this cycle, prompting moderator John Dickerson to even interject at one point that he was "going to turn this car around!"

Justice Antonin Scalia loved a good fight.

So it's only fitting that news of his death at age 79 ignited an immediate and partisan battle over who might take his place on the U.S. Supreme Court.

The latest batch of Hillary Clinton's emails from her time at the State Department includes 84 additional classified documents.

The new emails from her controversial private server, which were retroactively classified since she left office, include 81 which had been upgraded to confidential status and three to secret status. (Classified parts were redacted.)

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