NPR Political Coverage

With less than two weeks to go before Election Day, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have each framed a closing argument to voters. Each is also focusing on battleground states in ways that reveal different paths to victory — earning 270 electoral votes on Election Night. (You can read more about the state of play here.)

Here, we lay out what voters will see from each candidate in the final days of the 2016 presidential campaign.

We keep hearing that this election is like no other, but when I watch old movies, I often hear echoes of what's going on in the campaign.

The guy who opines in A Face in the Crowd (1957), say, that in the then-new age of television, "instead of long-winded public debates, people want capsule slogans."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Two weeks from Election Day, it looks more likely than ever that Democrats will win control of the Senate.

In case you needed more evidence of the toll this divisive campaign is taking on America, a new survey says more than a third of social media users are "worn out" by the amount of political content they encounter.

It has become a familiar story in a world bristling with live mics. A public figure is caught out using a vulgarity, and the media have to decide how to report the remark. Web media tend to be explicit, but the traditional media are more circumspect.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.


"There isn't a simple answer when it comes to Mormons and Trump," Stephanie Fowers said. "We are so torn right now that hardly anyone I know will even mention his name anymore because it's too depressing."

That makes her just another disenchanted voter in the endless slog that is Campaign 2016. Fowers, a writer from Cottonwood Heights, Utah — and a Mormon — said that among the Mormons she knows, she sees a lot of indecision.