NPR Political Coverage

It's All Politics
3:44 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Money Rules: Candidates Go Around The Law, As Cash Records To Be Smashed

Would-be presidential candidates are ditching "testing the waters" and "exploratory committees" to hold onto unlimited and undisclosed cash for longer.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

This is Part One in an occasional series of features on campaign finance, called "Money Rules."

The hunt for big bucks is changing the way politicians run for president.

When a candidate finally admits he or she is a candidate, donors are limited to gifts of $2,700. (A donor can give an additional $2,700 if the candidate makes it through to the general election.)

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It's All Politics
3:03 pm
Mon March 30, 2015

Elizabeth Warren On Hillary Clinton And Running For President

Sen. Elizabeth Warren talked about 2016 to WBUR's Here & Now: "What I care about is that everyone who runs for president, who runs for any national office right now, talks about this core set of issues."
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 4:19 pm

No one in politics today is hearing more calls from progressives to run than Elizabeth Warren, the popular and populist Massachusetts senator. Warren, though, denies any interest in the presidency and continued to do that Monday in an interview with Jeremy Hobson on WBUR's Here & Now.

"I'm out here fighting this fight," Warren said. "I'm fighting it every single day in the United States."

Asked if she wants to run, Warren said bluntly, "I do not."

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It's All Politics
6:03 am
Mon March 30, 2015

Clinton's Email Drama Hasn't Had Much Effect On 2016 Prospects

Hillary Clinton listens to another panelist during an event at the Center for American Progress, a left-leaning think tank.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 3:38 pm

South Carolina Rep. Trey Gowdy's Select Committee on Benghazi announced Friday in a statement that Hillary Clinton had wiped her private email server clean; that the committee is getting no additional emails from her; that it's leaving open the possibility of a third-party investigation; and that Republicans are promising to bring Clinton in for more questioning.

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It's All Politics
2:35 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

How Senate Democrats Will Choose Their Next Leader

Sen. Christopher Dodd, D-Conn., left, with then-Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle at a 1995 news conference on Capitol Hill. Harry Reid took over as leader in 2005 after Daschle unexpectedly lost his re-election. At the time, Reid was unknown to most Americans, but he beat back a challenge Dodd.
John Duricka AP

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 2:49 pm

When word came of Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid's decision to retire, various observers and Democratic constituencies quickly emerged with their choices for his successor as the party's Senate leader.

There were those who touted Patty Murray of Washington, the proven problem-solver and veteran legislator who has worked her way up the ladder of Senate succession. Others talked up Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, who in just two years has emerged as a star in the caucus and who has also joined the leadership in a junior role.

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It's All Politics
2:18 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

With Reid Out, Republicans See An Opportunity

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, wearing sunglasses to protect an injured eye. His announced retirement should set off a scramble to replace him.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 8:07 pm

Harry Reid, the wily Democratic Senate leader, was likely — once again — to be one of the most vulnerable incumbents up for re-election in 2016.

Few, though, would have bet the house against Reid — a sharp-elbowed campaigner — especially in a presidential year when demography will favor Democrats in a state where almost 3 in 10 people are Hispanic.

"Do you really want to go up against Harry Reid?" said one national GOP operative, pointing out Reid's bare-knuckles style of campaigning.

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