Naloxone

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Jake Harper

More people who are addicted to opioids are coming into the Marion County Jail, according to the sheriff’s office. The influx has the sheriff calling on Indiana lawmakers to spend more to combat addiction.   

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Governor Tom Wolf/FLICKR / https://www.flickr.com/photos/governortomwolf/

Medicaid spending on three important medications used to treat opioid addiction increased 136 percent nationwide between 2011 and 2016, according to a new report from the Urban Institute, a public policy think tank based in Washington D.C. The increases were much higher in some states—in seven states, rates rose more than 400 percent.

ADAPT Pharma / narcan.com

The overdose reversal drug naloxone is in high demand across Indiana. But the state is now seeing more mixes of opioids causing overdoses. That’s leading first responders to go through their supplies more quickly.

Overdoses caused by multiple types of opioids require larger or repeated doses of naloxone.

Justin Phillips founded the group Overdose Lifeline and says first responders may have to administer as many as a dozen doses of naloxone to combat one overdose caused by a mix of drugs.

Three Die In Heroin-Suspected Overdoses In Vigo County

Apr 20, 2017
J J / flickr.com/photos/tattoodjay/4172577749

Police suspect three Vigo County deaths could be the result of laced heroin. Authorities now say officers need to carry more of the overdose intervention drug naloxone.

Police say four people in Vigo County overdosed just this week and three of the overdoses were fatal. Officers started carrying one dose of naloxone in February of this year. Now some are carrying up to three doses. 

Sgt. Stephen Lockard with the Vigo County Drug Task Force says even that may not be enough. 

Governor Tom Wolf / https://www.flickr.com/photos/governortomwolf/

Attorney General Greg Zoeller Wednesday announced another round of grant funding to distribute the overdose intervention drug naloxone to first responders around the state. Zoeller says a more sustainable funding source is necessary.

Previous grants for naloxone provided kits of the drug to law enforcement and first responders in about 45 counties.  Zoeller says new funding – $400,000 – will expand that further, with the eventual goal of statewide supply.

PunchingJudy / https://www.flickr.com/photos/punchingjudy/1934879517

Bartholomew County school officials say a student overdosed on opioids Monday morning at Columbus East High School in an attempted suicide. A resource officer was able to revive the student with naloxone. School officials now say they plan to increase access to the overdose antidote.

Last spring, four Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation schools received doses of the overdose intervention drug.

Governor Tom Wolf / https://www.flickr.com/photos/governortomwolf/

Update: Governor Mike Pence, on September 22nd, has directed the ISDH to move forward on the following initiative, which was introduced at the Governor's Task Force on Drug Enforement, Treatment and Prevention Tuesday afternoon.

Governor Tom Wolf / https://www.flickr.com/photos/governortomwolf/

Half-a-dozen nurses from around the state attended a training event this week as part of Community Health Network’s efforts to increase awareness of and access to naloxone, an opioid overdose reversal drug.

The network also plans to hold training sessions for the public at its facilities in central Indiana, Kokomo and Anderson.

Community Health’s Director of Pain Management Kim Sharp says participants will learn about the signs and symptoms of an overdose, as well as free naloxone kits and directions for using them.

Craig Zirpolo

Thanks to new laws lifting restrictions on the availability of naloxone, the overdose-intervention drug is now easier to find than ever before. But the drug’s skyrocketing price means certain public health agencies are having to hustle to keep it on the shelves.

Craig Zirpolo

More than 500 pharmacies and treatment centers across the state can now distribute naloxone without a prescription under a new standing order from the Indiana state department of health.

The barriers to obtaining the overdose intervention drug have been falling throughout the last decade as the number of drug overdoses related to heroin and other opioids has increased statewide.

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