Naloxone

Three Die In Heroin-Suspected Overdoses In Vigo County

Apr 20, 2017
J J / https://www.flickr.com/photos/tattoodjay/4172577749

Police suspect three Vigo County deaths could be the result of laced heroin. Authorities now say officers need to carry more of the overdose intervention drug naloxone.

Police say four people in Vigo County overdosed just this week and three of the overdoses were fatal. Officers started carrying one dose of naloxone in February of this year. Now some are carrying up to three doses. 

Sgt. Stephen Lockard with the Vigo County Drug Task Force says even that may not be enough. 

Governor Tom Wolf / https://www.flickr.com/photos/governortomwolf/

Attorney General Greg Zoeller Wednesday announced another round of grant funding to distribute the overdose intervention drug naloxone to first responders around the state. Zoeller says a more sustainable funding source is necessary.

Previous grants for naloxone provided kits of the drug to law enforcement and first responders in about 45 counties.  Zoeller says new funding – $400,000 – will expand that further, with the eventual goal of statewide supply.

PunchingJudy / https://www.flickr.com/photos/punchingjudy/1934879517

Bartholomew County school officials say a student overdosed on opioids Monday morning at Columbus East High School in an attempted suicide. A resource officer was able to revive the student with naloxone. School officials now say they plan to increase access to the overdose antidote.

Last spring, four Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation schools received doses of the overdose intervention drug.

Governor Tom Wolf / https://www.flickr.com/photos/governortomwolf/

Update: Governor Mike Pence, on September 22nd, has directed the ISDH to move forward on the following initiative, which was introduced at the Governor's Task Force on Drug Enforement, Treatment and Prevention Tuesday afternoon.

Governor Tom Wolf / https://www.flickr.com/photos/governortomwolf/

Half-a-dozen nurses from around the state attended a training event this week as part of Community Health Network’s efforts to increase awareness of and access to naloxone, an opioid overdose reversal drug.

The network also plans to hold training sessions for the public at its facilities in central Indiana, Kokomo and Anderson.

Community Health’s Director of Pain Management Kim Sharp says participants will learn about the signs and symptoms of an overdose, as well as free naloxone kits and directions for using them.

Craig Zirpolo

Thanks to new laws lifting restrictions on the availability of naloxone, the overdose-intervention drug is now easier to find than ever before. But the drug’s skyrocketing price means certain public health agencies are having to hustle to keep it on the shelves.

Craig Zirpolo

More than 500 pharmacies and treatment centers across the state can now distribute naloxone without a prescription under a new standing order from the Indiana state department of health.

The barriers to obtaining the overdose intervention drug have been falling throughout the last decade as the number of drug overdoses related to heroin and other opioids has increased statewide.

Governor Tom Wolf / https://www.flickr.com/photos/governortomwolf/

Six conservation officers in the Indiana Department of Natural Resources have started carrying the overdose-intervention drug naloxone.

The move serves as the latest illustration of the drug’s increasing availability, which blocks the effects of opioids such as heroin, morphine and oxycodone.

Tyler Brock is a conservation officer for the agency’s Law Enforcement District 10, where the officers received training on how to administer the drug.

Flickr Creative Commons / https://www.flickr.com/photos/intropin/4499124890

The Indiana attorney general is putting a “surge” of heroin and opioid antidote into the field in order to combat a rising number of overdose deaths. The A-G announced $127 thousand in grants to three organizations Thursday to buy more Naloxone kits and train first responders on how to use them.

Attorney General Greg Zoeller calls this a “triage” phase of reducing opioid addiction. The first part, he says, is cracking down on the oversupply of strong painkillers.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

State and local road funding, harsher penalties for drug dealers, and holding schools harmless for a drop in ISTEP scores – those are some of the initiatives Governor Mike Pence says will be part of his legislative agenda for the upcoming session.  

Pence unveiled his $1 billion state road funding plan months ago, a proposal that spends down the state’s budget reserves and incorporates bonding. He signed on last month to a Senate Republican local road funding bill worth more than $400 million.  

Pages