Matt Haimovitz

pentatonemusic.com

Troika is an all-Russian Pentatone release featuring sonatas by Shostakovich, Rachmaninoff, and Prokofiev, along with new arrangements of Russian-themed music from Paul McCartney to Pussy Riot. The cello/piano duo Matt Haimovitz and Christopher O'Riley perform a substantial and creative program based on repression of artists. WBAA Music Director John Clare spoke to Haimovitz and O'Riley about their arrangements, politics, and learning repertoire for the first time.

What's New: New Baroque

Sep 13, 2017
enjott.com

You've heard of old wine in new bottles...in the Gospel according to Luke: "And no man putteth new wine into old bottles; else the new wine will burst the bottles, and be spilled, and the bottles shall perish. But new wine must be put into new bottles; and both are preserved. No man also having drunk old wine straightway desireth new: for he saith, The old is better."

We’ll hear some new music for old ensembles, and talk with composer and soprano Majel Connery from Oracle Hysterical on today’s What’s New.

Marquis Classics

Stringed instruments vary from harps to basses, violins to folk fiddles, and guitars of all shapes. Some are plucked, and others bowed. The earliest stringed instruments, ancient lyres, were found in Mesopotamia. Throughout history, different countries had their own take on how the instruments look and sound, and how they are played.

We'll hear Ginastera, Janacek, Bach, plus new music for string quartet, harp, guitar, violin and more! 

Stephanie Mackinnon

A new program airs Sunday and Tuesday nights on WBAA Classical: What's New. Host John Clare features new music, new releases, and interesting guests. Hear a special preview of this week's What's New, and let us know what you think.


What's New: 9/11 Music

Sep 9, 2016
alchetron.com

Conductor JoAnn Falletta shared: "Can anyone be the same after 9/11? Can I ever forget the images I saw on television...or later, the heartrending homemade altars of flowers and candles on the New York city streets we thought were invincible?

Most of all, I remember how important it was to be together that weekend at our concert, to sit in that darkened hall and draw comfort from Beethoven and from each other, to sing our National Anthem with a searing intensity we had never felt before, to believe that the part of man that could create such beauty as music was the part of us that would sustain and heal us and, somehow, make us whole again."

We’ll hear music inspired from events on September 11, as well as some of the composers on today’s What’s New!