manufacturing

Town of Orleans

 

One of Orange County's biggest employers, the century-old Paoli furniture factory, is shutting down.

The region already has some of the highest unemployment in the state, so local officials hope the closure can be an opportunity, not a setback.

The Paoli company will lay off 367 workers and close its furniture plant's doors by October 2017.

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Srinivasan Chandrasekar / Purdue University

Researchers at Purdue University have found a way to fix a long-standing issue in manufacturing, where cutting a piece of metal can make its edges splinter or break apart.

They hope their solution will reap big savings in fuel and production costs.

The problem is called a shear-band. It's a deformity that occurs when a cutting machine pushes through metal, scrunching up its edges at a microscopic level.

Dan O'Connor / https://www.flickr.com/photos/doconnr/4152865395

A federal grant will let Indianapolis hire an economic recovery counselor to help put out-of-use industrial sites – and laid-off employees – back to work.

The city qualified for the $355,000 grant comes from the U.S. Department of Commerce's Economic Development Agency after thousands of recent manufacturing layoffs – especially those at Navistar and, earlier this year, Carrier.

"We can't keep suffering these job losses and not try to mitigate it in the future,” says Indianapolis economic development administrator Brent Pierce.

Courtesy Cummins Engine

New census data puts Columbus, Ind. in the top 20 cities for start-up business growth nationwide.

The numbers, released earlier this month, show that companies less than a year old made up nearly 5 percent of the city's businesses in 2014. That’s a 1.1 percent increase from 2009.

GM

General Motors will invest $90 million to upgrade its Marion Metal Center in Grant County, the company announced Monday.

 

The money will pay for new, high-tech equipment at the 60-year-old facility where the company employs about 1,400 people, supplying metal parts for GM vehicles across North America.

 

It's the largest investment the Indiana Economic Development Corporation has announced since late May.

 

Chris Johnson/Purdue Research Foundation / https://news.uns.purdue.edu/images/2016/imi-exterior.jpg

 R. Byron Pipes keeps a Tupperware box of carbon fiber knick-knacks inside his office at Purdue Research Park's Indiana Manufacturing Institute—a building so new it doesn’t even show up on Google Maps.

Apart from a large orange blob, (an interesting polymer-experiment-gone-wrong, he says), the knick-knacks—hinges, chains and molds—are all made of the same feather-light, stormy-gray material: carbon fiber composite.

Lynn Friedman / https://www.flickr.com/photos/lynnfriedman/18263113926

The number of unemployed Hoosiers decreased last month, the first time Indiana’s jobless rate has declined since September of last year.

The unemployment rate went down two-tenths of a percent in May, falling to five percent.

That’s the largest one-month decline in more than a year. 

Bureau of Economic Analysis / U.S. Department of Commerce

Indiana led all the other states in GDP growth for the fourth quarter of 2015.

The state’s gross domestic product rose 3 percent – with manufacturing and agriculture driving most of that increase.

 

The GDP measures how much was spent on goods and services produced in-state. Indiana’s late-2015 increase from $338.7 million to $341.2 million in GDP was top in the nation, with neighboring Ohio coming in second.

David Wilson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidwilson1949/12783674125

Steelmaker ArcelorMittal, whose largest North American mill is at Indiana Harbor in East Chicago, is introducing a new high-strength steel for cars.

It's part of an effort to boost profits at the world's largest steel producer by volume -- amid an uncertain time for the industry.

The new steel is designed for the interior rails and pillars that make cars safer during a crash.

A spokesperson from Arcelor says it should make cars lighter and cheaper to produce when it's rolled out next year.  

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Indiana is seeing a boom in manufacturing job creation – outpacing most of the country. And even more jobs will open up as baby boomers retire.

Many businesses are working harder to fill those jobs with military veterans, like 57-year-old Tim Turner.

Right now, he shares a house on a quiet street northwest of downtown Indianapolis with two other formerly homeless veterans.

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