logistics

The first stop in our series on the Ports of Indiana was Burns Harbor, an international maritime facility in the heart of steel country. Four hours down Interstate 65, the Port of Jeffersonville is less a port and more a manufacturing hub that happens to be on the Ohio River.

For the next part of our series, Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Annie Ropeik reports Jeffersonville is pushing ahead with expansions to cement its place in the Midwest industrial corridor.

Indiana’s ports move millions of tons each year of the stuff that’s made and used at Midwest factories, including steel, grains and coal. The three ports – one on Lake Michigan and two on the Ohio River – connect Indiana to the national and global economies, and each has to find its own ways to keep up with change.

For the first part of a three-part series, we visited the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor to see how it’s secured its place in the steel industry.

UPS announced plans this week to open a $260 million shipping hub in Plainfield by 2019 – one of the first big logistics investments to come after the state passed its road funding plan.

The repairs and upgrades that $1 billion-a-year funding package will fund with tax and fee increases are a big deal for companies that rely on roads.

Data via IDWD

 

Department store Kohl's announced this week it will open a distribution center in a large warehouse near Indianapolis International Airport next year.

 

It'll be part of Indiana's most steadily growing logistics sector: The Department of Workforce Development predicts the state will add 5- to 6,000 warehousing jobs within the next decade.

 

For its part, Kohl's plans to hire 300 full-time and 600 part-time workers at the new warehouse in the All Points industrial park in Plainfield.

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced new fuel standards for big trucks, including a 25 percent cut to tractor-trailer emissions and fuel use in the next decade.

It's part of ongoing efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. And it means big changes — and some potential new markets — for companies like trailer manufacturer Wabash National.

At the main Wabash factory in Lafayette, more than 3,000 people in hard hats and safety glasses assemble truck trailers from sheets of steel.