Law and Criminal Justice

courtesy Indiana Black Legislative Caucus

Members of the Indiana Black Legislative Caucus will kick off a series of meetings later this month aimed, in part, at convincing Hoosiers that similar issues affect rural and urban areas of the state.

And, says caucus member Robin Shackleford (D-Indianapolis), the meetings are a way to work across the aisle, too.

“We’re talking about things that would benefit everyone – that are good for everyone – that the conservative side actually authored a lot of this legislation,” Shackleford says.

Currently, 32 states have laws that set up guidelines for victims of some crimes to meet with the offenders. The precursor to these programs was established in Elkhart County in 1977. It serves around 800 cases annually.

The program is now threatened with a funding cut.

Many of the cases that go through the program look like Robert Perry’s. Not so long ago Perry was struggling with addiction and decided to rob a store.

Galls / galls.com/galls-active-shooter-armor-kit

Police officers in Monticello are bulking up their personal protection with the purchase of a dozen body armor kits.

Police Chief Randy Soliday says the department is seeing more violence and firearms calls, so officers need to be prepared.

“We felt that it would be better to come up with some additional protection,” he says. “Ballistic helmets and ballistic panels that we could put in carriers – so we could better equip the officers to handle higher-powered firearms.”

Soliday says sometimes, when a call comes in, officers don’t know if a firearm is present.

FBI Searches Another Muncie City Department Property

May 18, 2017
Dave Newman / Flickr / flickr.com/photos/groovysoup/4505842946

Muncie officials say the city is cooperating with an FBI investigation that searched a Muncie Sanitary District property Thursday morning.

In a statement on Thursday afternoon, Muncie Mayor Dennis Tyler says the city had not been told why the property on Kilgore Avenue across from the former BorgWarner factory is being searched. 

Tyler says the city was only informed of the search from media reports, when reporters from The Star Press newspaper were told to leave the property being searched.

Nixle / nixle.com/public-safety-communications/

The Frankfort Police Department has reintroduced a mobile alert system in hopes of reaching more residents more quickly.

Police chief Troy Bacon says the department used the technology – called Nixle – before, but it was dropped when the force moved to a centralized dispatch system.

Bacon says through Nixle, the police force can send out alerts, and residents can send in tips.

Attorney General Curtis Hill will continue to live in the Indianapolis area despite the repeal of a law requiring him to do so.

Senate Bill 400 changed two words in the Indiana code: “at Indianapolis” became “in Indiana.” That refers to where the attorney general is required to live.

Groups Press For Revival Of Bias Crimes Legislation

Mar 15, 2017

A coalition of groups is pressuring Indiana lawmakers to revive legislation that would allow judges to impose tougher sentences for crimes motivated by factors such as a person’s race, religion, disability, sexual orientation or gender identity. 

Steve Burns/Indiana Public Broadcasting

The Trump administration is laying out its plans for ramping up enforcement of illegal immigration.

Memos released Tuesday by the Department of Homeland Security say the agency is changing the way it prioritizes people for deportation.

When people who’ve entered the country illegally are detained in the Midwest, some of them fly out of Indiana.

Azra Ceylan / WBAA

The number of tips regarding the Delphi homicides case has doubled since the Wednesday release of an audio recording from one of the victims’ cell phones.

Indiana State Police, the FBI and the Carroll County Sheriff’s Department have received nearly 4,000 phone and email tips thus far.

ISP Sergeant Tony Slocum says the release of the audio recording plus a monetary award for information caused the influx of tips.

Slocum says cases are often solved with the help of information from the public.

Post-its at the Delphi United Methodist Church are a testament to a community's grief and disbelief
Azra Ceylan / WBAA

The quick thinking of one of two murdered Delphi teens may give law enforcement the necessary clue needed to find the girls’ killer.

The bodies of 14-year-old Liberty German and 13-year-Old Abigail Williams were found on Valentine’s Day, a day after they failed to return from a hike near the Delphi Historic Trail in Carroll County. The deaths quickly were treated as a homicide.

On Wednesday, Indiana State Police released an audio recording found on German’s cell phone—a three-second clip of a male voice saying “down the hill.”

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