job training

High School Job Training Takes On New Life In Indiana

Jul 3, 2017

What’s the point of high school? To get students ready for college or the workforce?

For years, Indiana officials have gone back and forth.

“Indiana has tended to shift one way and say ‘everyone needs a four year degree’ and then we shift the other way and say ‘we just need technical certifications,’” says Molly Deuberry, Indiana Department of Education spokesperson. “Really, the truth is in the middle, we need a great mix of all of those things.”

 

Gov. Eric Holcomb told Indiana factory owners Wednesday that he and the state legislature will do more this year to help find and train new workers.

At the Indiana Manufacturers Association’s annual legislative briefing, Holcomb said he knows factories are struggling to find enough qualified employees.

Vincennes University

 

Vincennes University is teaming up with Indiana manufacturers to recruit more women into tech and engineering jobs.

 

The public school will sponsor 46 women to live in a dedicated dorm while pursuing two-year science, technology, engineering or math degrees next fall.

 

Annie Ropeik

In the coming months, Subaru needs to add hundreds of workers at its huge Lafayette plant. But it hasn't been easy for the car-maker or other manufacturers to hire people with the right skills.

So they're teaming up, with trainings starting in April, to create a new workforce from scratch.

Lafayette's Subaru of Indiana Automotive, or SIA, is the only Subaru factory outside Japan. Inside, 5,000 people are turning chunks of steel into cars.

Re-entering The Workforce Series: Part 2 -- Students

Aug 12, 2015
Gretchen Frazee / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The workplace is changing at a rapid pace -- employees have to learn how to use new technology every day, jobs can often be more short-term and project-oriented, and companies are looking for people who not only have the skills to fill today’s positions but are able to think ahead and shape how business is done in the future.

Flazingo Photos / https://www.flickr.com/photos/124247024@N07/

Hoosiers enrolled in the Healthy Indiana Plan program will now have access to job training and preparedness resources. 

About 300 thousand people enrolled in HIP 2.0 will soon receive letters inviting them to participate in Gateway to Work, a program run by the state’s Family and Social Services Administration.  FSSA Family Resources director Adrienne Shields says the program is available not just to unemployed HIP 2.0 enrollees, but also to those seeking to move up the ladder.

Rachel Morello / StateImpact Indiana

It’s been six years since businesses suffered from the country’s worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. Now that the economy is back on track, some employers say they can’t fill jobs fast enough.