IU School of Medicine

Grant To Help Create Holistic Cancer Care

Feb 7, 2018

A new Indiana University School of Medicine program to holistically address a cancer patient’s needs has received a $14 million gift.

Supportive oncology provides extra layers of care for patients with cancer. Some studies show it can help prolong life. The grant from the Walther Cancer Foundation will enable the creation of a program to addresses not just the management of pain and symptoms but also psychological issues like anxiety or depression.

IU School of Medicine Dean Dr. Jay Hess says it’s a growing trend in cancer care.

Sonia Belviso / https://www.flickr.com/photos/soniabelviso/

A recent study finds the taste of alcohol is closely linked to addiction markers in the brain.  

The research project from a team at the IU School of Medicine is the first to use two different types of advanced brain imaging techniques to strengthen evidence that reward receptors in the right side of the brain are tied to addiction. 

Assistant Research Professor of Neurology Brandon Oberlin says the study, conducted with 28 male beer drinkers, sought to find out what areas of the brain are 

  involved when a beer drinker tastes beer.

Michael Coghlan / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecogh/

Indiana has the second-highest percentage in the nation of children who have a parent who’s been incarcerated. A new study shows this can have long lasting effects on a child’s wellness.

According to the National Survey of Children’s Health, 11-percent of Hoosier children have a parent who has been incarcerated.  A new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation highlights the impact that time behind bars has on children.

Associate Professor at IU School of Medicine and Riley Hospital for Children Pediatric Dr. Matthew Aalsma, says the report is a valuable tool.

Indiana University School of Medicine / Facebook

Researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine have identified biomarkers in women that can predict with 82 percent accuracy who is more likely to have suicidal thoughts. 

The study compared app-based questionnaire answers of more than 50 women with psychiatric diagnoses combined with blood-based biomarker tests to get the results.

Dr. Alexander Niculescu says, historically, women have been understudied when it comes to suicide risk and biology.