internet

One day, your internet use may not be limited by 4G speeds. As early as 2018, many in the United States will be able to use 5G enabled devices.

Just a few blocks away from the roar of the Speedway, there’s a tiny gray house.

Unlike its neighbors, it’s not receiving an internet connection from wires running inside. Its internet comes from a 5G radio.

This is one of Verizon’s prototypes – the only one in Indiana. The company is partnering with Ericcson and Intel to demonstrate 5G wireless internet.

Justin Marty / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jmarty/3677688990

The Indiana Rural Broadband Working Group, convened last year, developed a report for the legislature identifying steps towards blanketing the state with quality broadband coverage. 

Representative Eric Koch (R- Bedford), who served on the working group, says a first step is the creation of a new designation – Broadband Ready Communities. 

Joi Ito / Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/joi/2594240682

Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales recently came to Purdue to talk about “democracy and the internet.”

Before his lecture, WBAA News Director Stan Jastrzebski sat down with Wales to see if there are ways to improve the way people interact with the World Wide Web -- and in the process make it safer for all users.

Carmel Company's iKeg Could Help Bars On New Year's

Dec 30, 2014
Matthew Peoples / https://www.flickr.com/photos/leftymgp/7332282888

As bars and breweries stock up for New Year‘s Eve, some will use an app from a Carmel company to make sure they‘re not tapped out.   

Because you can‘t see into a beer keg, SteadyServ CEO Steve Hershberger says bars can’t tell when they‘re running low, and brewers don’t know which beers are selling fastest. He says most bars just guess.

Perry Stein is an intern at The New Republic.

Cats may not be man's best friend, but they're arguably something even better: man's key to instant Internet pageviews. It's a long-established fact that Internet content — whether it's a cutesy video, a photoshopped inside joke, or a longform public health article — has a better chance of achieving coveted "viral" status if it somehow evokes the sound of purring.