INDOT

A study created for the Indiana Department of Transportation, on how much money tolling would generate for the state, ignores current toll restrictions in state law.

The study found that there is an 85 percent chance toll revenue would exceed $39 billion from 2021 to 2050, if a statewide Interstate tolling program were implemented.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

The success of Indiana’s small regional airports ebb and flow in tune with the economy. Most airports have seen downturns in business and aero tourism the past few years, but they're also reaping the benefits that come from involved local sponsors and pilots.

“A lot of times, on a Saturday morning, pilots do what we like to call ‘go out for the $100 hamburger,’” says Putnam County Regional Airport spokesman J.R. Scott.

Courtesy Google Maps

The Indiana Department of Transportation Tuesday devoted a portion of its website to explain J-turns. Meanwhile, proposals for the new type of intersection are still raising concerns.

The J-turn makes drivers turn right to merge into traffic, then merge left into a J-shaped lane and make a U-turn – instead of proceeding directly across oncoming lanes of traffic.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA

Gov. Eric Holcomb rolled out a regionally-specific portion of the state’s five-year infrastructure plan Thursday during a stop in West Lafayette. The governor and INDOT officials say interstates and bridges will be hit hardest with orange barrels.

INDOT Commissioner Joe McGuinness says one of the big priorities is adding lanes to I-65 and I-70 – he says he’d like to see a minimum of three lanes run each direction.

McGuinness says overpasses are also targeted in the plan.

INDOT

Indiana Department of Transportation officials pitched the department’s proposal for two new J-turn intersections in Logansport Tuesday night. But residents appear to want to put a halt to the idea.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

When, earlier this week, a train derailed in downtown Crawfordsville, it brought to a head some of the concerns Mayor Todd Barton has lodged with the railroads that crisscross his city.

Sure, the tracks caused regular traffic jams before, and city leaders have long hoped for a railroad relocation project, but was this week’s incident the locomotive that broke the camel’s back?

We talk about that incident on this week’s Ask The Mayor program.

Uwe Mayer / flickr.com/photos/intermayer/

Small-town West Central Indiana commissioners say they’re happy about changes made to a state-issued matching grant intended for infrastructure work.

At a meeting in Crawfordsville Monday with Department of Transportation officials, Vermillion County Commissioner Tim Yocum said one of the new requirements – an asset management report – won’t require counties to hire pricey consultants.

“Most counties save $20,000, $30,000 or $40,000 by utilizing their own people,” Yocum says. “It seemed like the state was really trying to work with us to make this happen.”

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

This spring is dotted with important meetings in Crawfordsville – meetings which could help decide the near future of the city.

Whether it’s talking with state transportation leaders about how the city fits into the state’s long-term plans or meeting with parents concerned about greater incidence of students taking their own lives, the community has some important decisions to make.

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we talk with Crawfordsville’s Todd Barton about the stakes for a town that’s hoping for a rebirth.

Chris Morisse Vizza/WBAA Radio

Two different messages delivered just one day apart at Purdue University’s annual “Road School” appear to indicate a disconnect between Governor Eric Holcomb and Holcomb’s newly appointed Indiana Department of Transportation Commissioner Joe McGuinness.

McGuinness, who served five years as Mayor of Franklin, says he’s a local-minded person.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Indiana Department of Transportation officials say an unreasonable request led to Iowa Pacific Holdings removing itself from a deal to run the Hoosier State passenger train.

But Iowa Pacific’s CEO says a quirk in the contracts between his company, INDOT and Amtrak doomed the partnership.

Ed Ellis says his firm’s compensation from the deal decreased each time on-time performance improved.

“The way the contracts worked, we ended up getting less money as the train ran more on time,” Ellis says.

Pages