Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department

Community Reacts After Board Clears IMPD Officers

May 14, 2018

Attorneys representing officers Michal Dinnsen and Carlton Howard faced off against attorneys from the City of Indianapolis, in a three-day series of hearings before the Civilian Police Merit Board. (Photo by Drew Daudelin)

 

IMPD officers Michal Dinnsen and Carlton Howard shot and killed 45-year-old Aaron Bailey on June 29, 2017, after Bailey crashed into a tree during a high-speed car chase.

The shooting left an unarmed man dead and two officers under investigation. A special prosecutor found them innocent, and they received no criminal charges.

IMPD Chief Bryan Roach says internal discussions since the Aaron Bailey shooting have centered around implicit bias. And he says by 2018 all officers will be trained in fair and impartial policing. (Photo by Drew Daudelin)

Indianapolis Police Chief Bryan Roach answered questions Wednesday about the decision not to file charges against officers who shot and killed Aaron Bailey in June. The shooting happened after Bailey crashed his car into a tree during a high-speed car chase.

Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett (center), announces reforms for IMPD with Chief Bryan Roach (left) and Deputy Mayor of Neighborhood Engagement David Hampton (right). (Photo by Drew Daudelin)

Two weeks ago Indianapolis police officers shot and killed an unarmed man, after a traffic stop and a brief car chase. Investigations into the incident are still ongoing, but Mayor Joe Hogsett Friday announced a series of reforms related to police use of force.

J J / https://www.flickr.com/photos/tattoodjay/4172577749

Soon-to-be Indianapolis Chief of Police Troy Riggs is perfectly aware that his new job is not going to be an easy one, and is prepared to meet Indianapolis' biggest problems head on.

Riggs says his plan will build on what current Chief Rick Hite has started, focusing in on the most troubled areas of Indianapolis and getting the most violent of Indianapolis' criminals off the streets.

Riggs was appointed by mayor-elect Joe Hogsett Tuesday.

Joe Hogsett for Mayor / Facebook

Indianapolis Mayor-elect Joe Hogsett has ordered a top-to-bottom review of city agencies before his inauguration Jan. 1.

The review is a page from Greg Ballard's playbook -- Hogsett has even hired the same Indianapolis accounting firm which reviewed city government when Ballard was first elected in 2007. Crowe Horwath will report how many workers each department has, what projects are in progress, and what their priorities are.

Christopher Ayers / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Indiana’s highly-publicized First Church of Cannabis is going to court, hoping to stop the state from enforcing marijuana laws when it comes to the use of cannabis in its church services. 

The state's so-called "religious freedom" law creates a legal standard that says government must have a compelling reason to restrict someone’s religious practice and do so in the least burdensome way possible. 

Steve Baker / https://www.flickr.com/photos/littlebiglens/8989916145/

The City of Indianapolis has taken precautions when it comes to police accountability and avoiding situations like the current one in Baltimore. That‘s according to Public Safety Director Troy Riggs.

Riggs says his department is spending roughly $200,000 modernizing its police review process. He says concerns IMPD officers and citizens alike believed the complaint and review process was antiquated, ineffective and too slow.

Increased Body Camera Use By Police Leads To Questions

Dec 18, 2014
Barbara Harrington / Indiana Public Broadcasting

When Bloomington police officer Matt Gilmore gets into his squad car, he has an extra set of eyes.

The Bloomington Police Department purchased 30 body cameras last year as part of  a trial program.

The officers wear the cameras  on their chests and flip them on  during interactions with the public, giving an up-close perspective of what’s happening.

IMPD Trying Out Body Cameras Starting This Week

Dec 15, 2014
VIEVU / http://www.vievu.com/

Body cameras for police officers are a reality in Indianapolis now.  

Department of Public Safety Director Troy Riggs says they‘ve looked into the technology for several months, but this week will be the week they try it out.

Riggs says he‘s been in contact with other departments who have also started the process of equipping officers with cameras.

The questions about the camera‘s continue with The Department of Public Safety putting together a "best practices" list that includes how to deal with the cameras in someone‘s home and other possible issues.