Indiana

Three new school-based telehealth clinics are opening in Indiana this week. The effort to increase access to healthcare for children in rural Indiana started when the states first school telehealth clinic opened four months ago in Elwood.

The three newest clinics are opening in the southern part of the state in Crothersville, Austin and Southwestern Jefferson County.

House GOP Rolls Out Road Funding Plan

Jan 4, 2017

 

House Republicans unveiled their road funding proposal and the proposed first steps would cover less than half of the state’s needs.

House Speaker Brian Bosma says Indiana needs an average of about $1.2 billion a year over the next 20 years for its roads. His caucus’ plan would immediately raise all fuel taxes by 10 cents to begin working toward that goal. Bosma says the House GOP plan would also create a new $15 annual fee on all vehicles.

“So, adding the registration fee and the gas tax – for the average Hoosier, $5 per month,” Bosma says.

Christian Steiner

No one is quite sure of where the term Hoosier came from, but it was definitely in use from the 1840s, to describe a resident of Indiana. Back in 1816, Indiana became the 19th state – a time where Beethoven and Schubert were both writing music in Europe.

We’ll celebrate the great state of Indiana, with musicians and orchestras from the Hoosier state, including the Indianapolis Symphony, and composer Ned Rorem on this edition of What’s New!

http://www.in.gov/ibc/images/

A new program airs Sunday and Tuesday nights on WBAA Classical: What's New. Host John Clare features new music, new releases, and interesting guests. Hear a special preview of this week's What's New, and let us know what you think.


Barbara Brosher/Indiana Public Broadcasting

A juvenile correctional facility in southeastern Indiana started an experiment two years ago.

It distributed secure tablet computers to all of the girls.

The goal of the technology was to help improve the girls’ educational experiences and opportunities.

But the tablets are having an impact beyond the classroom.

Tablets Give Teachers, Students More Access To Educational Tools

NYC Department of Education / http://schools.nyc.gov/default.htm

The 2016 ISTEP+ scores show the number of students passing the test decreased for the second year in a row.

Fifty-two percent of students passed both the English Language Arts and Math sections of the test. This is compared to 53 percent in 2015.

Fewer students passed just the English Language Arts test- 66 percent this year compared to 67 percent in 2015.

Fifty-nine percent of students passed the math section in 2016, a drop from 61 percent in 2015.

EDP Renewables

The northern half of Indiana has long been touted as a good place to invest in wind energy—the state has the 12th most wind turbines in the country.

But just because companies are investing in wind infrastructure, doesn’t mean the industry is booming quite the way it once was.

In 2007, Indiana had no large wind turbines.

By 2009, the state’s more than 600 turbines produced enough energy to power nearly 400,000 homes.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Hoosiers will find a constitutional amendment on the ballot this November for the first time in six years.

This amendment would protect a citizen’s right to hunt and fish. 

But Indiana Public Broadcasting's Nick Janzen reports some people are wondering what the amendment will actually do.

Public Question number 1 asks voters to “forever preserve” a Hoosier’s right to hunt, fish and harvest wildlife.

Judy Baxter / https://www.flickr.com/photos/judybaxter/

Indiana’s registration deadline to vote in the November election is Tuesday.

And, more Hoosiers are registered this year than in any election during the past decade.

The total number of registered voters is approaching 4.8 million as the registration deadline nears.

That’s about 200,000 voters more than any election since at least 2002.

Downs Center for Indiana Politics director Andrew Downs says the surge is in part new voters.

But, often he finds people don’t realize they’re already registered.

in.gov/greggforgovernor.com

A leading Indiana environmental organization won’t endorse in the gubernatorial race because it doesn’t have “enthusiastic support” for plans put forward by either Republican Eric Holcomb or Democrat John Gregg.

Steve Francis is the political chair of the Hoosier chapter of the Sierra Club. He says Indiana’s environmental issues – for instance, its reliance on coal and health issues created by poor air quality – have been ignored by the current administration.

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