Indiana University

IU To Turn GHG Emissions Into Plant Fertilizer

Nov 13, 2017

Indiana University wants to improve its sustainability – and it’s turning to a novel way of recycling to do so. The school’s main campus will turn its greenhouse gas emissions into plant fertilizer with the help of a photobioreactor.

The machine is made out of PVC pipe and will sit on top of the university’s central heating plant. There, it will capture plant emissions, which will be used to feed algae, which project co-leader Chip Glaholt says will be turned into plant fertilizer.

Bacteria's 'Sense Of Touch' Discovery Made In Indiana

Oct 30, 2017

A new discovery by Indiana University researchers reveals how bacteria sense touch. The information provides new clues into how bacteria form biofilms, which can be harmful to humans and critical infrastructure.

Indiana University biology professor Yves Brun says most bacteria don’t just float around but attach to surfaces and form colonies called biofilms.

“These biofilms have a huge impact on the environment, on human health, on industry and so on,” says Brun.

Gov. Holcomb Defers To Congress On DACA Action

Sep 6, 2017

Gov. Eric Holcomb isn’t saying if Indiana will take any action around Hoosiers with DACA status, given to undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children.

About 10,000 people in Indiana have that status, out of 800,000 nationwide. But President Donald Trump said this week the program will end and that status will be revoked in six months without Congressional intervention.

 

Reagan Roush likes things spicy.

“When I make Mexican ground beef, I add an onion and a green pepper and three habanero peppers,”  Roush says, with a smile. “And yes, it is hot.”

For Roush, who is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, cooking is more than just the steps to a tasty meal. To him, it’s a sign he’s moving toward his ultimate goal: independence.

Bundesinnung Hörgeräteakustiker / https://www.flickr.com/photos/134783624@N07/

An Indiana University study indicates hearing aids fitted by a patient are just as effective as those fitted by a professional audiologist.

Currently, hearing aids aren’t able to be purchased over-the-counter. Instead, people must have a professional evaluate their hearing loss, set the hearing aid’s sensitivity and teach proper use.

But the study shows even when patients fit and adjust the hearing aids themselves, they report hearing improvements and satisfaction similar to patients who work with an audiologist.

Alex Wild / http://www.myrmecos.neT

New research from Indiana University scientists shines a light on what makes certain insects male or female. The study, published Monday in the journal Nature Communications, examined what happened when researchers suppressed the so-called “doublesex” master gene, which assigns traits to different sexes of the same species.

Indiana University To Accept Students From Banned Countries

Feb 3, 2017
Peter Balonon-Rosen / IPBS

Officials with the Indiana University system say President Donald Trump’s immigration and travel executive order won’t change the university’s policies.

The IU system’s eight campuses will continue to accept qualified international students from the seven countries where travel is currently suspended.

University Faculty And Staff Reel From Trump's Travel Ban

Jan 30, 2017

For Babak Seradjeh, it’s routine by now – as a celebrated physicist at Indiana University, he travels abroad three or four times a year for work. Last Saturday, the assistant professor, with dual Iranian-Canadian citizenship, was heading to Israel.

“I left my house at 8:30, I took a shuttle to the airport,” Seradjeh says.

An executive order issued by President Donald Trump on Friday halts entry to the U.S. from seven predominantly Muslim countries, and has left Indiana colleges and universities scrambling to adjust.

Northeast Indiana Regional Partnership / https://www.flickr.com/photos/northeastindiana/

As expected, the Purdue University Trustees have approved the broad outlines of a plan to realign Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne.

But unlike the vast majority of the board’s votes, Friday’s was not without its dissenters.

Some trustees worry there isn’t enough detail in the plan, outside of noting which programs are slated for elimination or for a switch from one school’s governance to the other.

Others say they’re concerned the agreement may become a financial drain on Purdue.

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