Indiana Supreme Court

An Indiana death row inmate says the state can’t use its current lethal injection drug because it didn’t follow the proper rulemaking procedures to choose it.

A trial court sided with the state; the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled for the inmate, which brought the case to the state Supreme Court.

The Department of Correction chose a new lethal injection drug cocktail in 2014 – a combination that’s never been used in this country.

Ownership of beach property on Lake Michigan is in the balance in a lawsuit heard before the Indiana Supreme Court Thursday. The case centers on the question of public versus private property, and it could have far-reaching consequences.

Indiana’s judicial system is on track to achieve statewide electronic filing in all courts by early 2019 at the latest.

The state’s Supreme Court justices outlined the latest information from the court’s annual report Tuesday.

Seventy percent of all new cases statewide in the last year were filed through Odyssey, Indiana’s primary court data system. That’s up from 65 percent the year before.

 

The Indiana Supreme Court unanimously ruled Monday it can’t force the Department of Child Services to comply with caseload requirements in state law.

The Indiana Supreme Court will hear arguments in a legal battle playing out in Long Beach, on the shoreline of Lake Michigan. It centers on a simple question: Who owns the beach?       

Don and Bobbie Gunderson filed a complaint in April 2014 that claimed their property extended to the water’s edge, wherever that is at any given moment.

Indiana’s Supreme Court is back to its full five members as Gov. Eric Holcomb announces his selection of Wabash County Judge Christopher Goff to join the bench.

Holcomb says few decisions he’ll make as governor will be as impactful as his appointment of Goff. Holcomb calls the Ball State graduate a critical and forward thinker who believes in judicial restraint.

State Supreme Court Considers DCS Caseload Lawsuit

Jun 1, 2017

The Indiana Supreme Court heard arguments Thursday over whether a Department of Child Services caseworker’s lawsuit against the agency will move forward.

Only one of Indiana’s 19 DCS regions meets mandatory caseload limits at this time.

State law says DCS must provide enough caseworkers so that the average caseload in each region doesn’t exceed 12 active cases or 17 children supervised.

The Indiana Supreme Court made a decision that will likely cost local governments millions of dollars in property tax revenue.

The conflict surrounds property tax valuations of big box stores – in this case, a Kohl’s. Local governments say the assessment should be based on how much value the property is worth to the current user, not some hypothetical future user.

Gov. Eric Holcomb will soon find out which three candidates he’ll choose from to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Robert Rucker.

Indiana’s Judicial Nominating Commission is made up of the Chief Justice, three members chosen by the governor and three lawyers elected by other lawyers. When a judicial vacancy comes up on the state’s Supreme Court, the commission winnows a field of candidates down to three for the governor to pick from.

Justice Rucker To Leave Supreme Court

Jan 19, 2017

 

Indiana Supreme Court Justice Robert Rucker says he looks forward to spending more time with family as he prepares to step down from the court.

Rucker says he almost retired in 2012, when he turned 65 and was up for a retention vote.

The Gary native and 26-year veteran of the bench is the only current justice appointed by a Democratic governor. But he says he doesn’t expect the court to become more conservative because, in Indiana, a partially independent panel chooses the three nominees for the gubernatorial appointment.

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