Indiana State Department of Health

Governor Tom Wolf / https://www.flickr.com/photos/governortomwolf/

Update: Governor Mike Pence, on September 22nd, has directed the ISDH to move forward on the following initiative, which was introduced at the Governor's Task Force on Drug Enforement, Treatment and Prevention Tuesday afternoon.

cheriejoyful / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cheriejphotos/

The infant mortality rates among black babies in Indiana are more than twice the state’s average, according to data from the Indiana State Department of Health.

In 2014, 14.7 babies per every 1000 born to black mothers died before their first birthday. The state’s total infant mortality rate was a little over 7 per every 1000.

Additionally, the rate of Sudden Unexpected Infant Death Syndrome—SUIDS—among black babies is getting exponentially higher. In 2014, 240 African-American babies per every 100,000 died from SUIDS, a 60 percent increase over the year before.

deepfruit / https://www.flickr.com/photos/slippek/

More than a year after the first one was established, more than one thousand people are now enrolled in Indiana’s several county-run needle exchange programs, and the Indiana State Department of Health is crediting them as one of the most effective ways to combat the spread of HIV and Hepatitis C.

IAEA Imagebank / https://www.flickr.com/photos/iaea_imagebank/

Despite assurances from officials that local transmission of the Zika virus is unlikely in Indiana, the Indiana Department of Health is set to receive millions of dollars from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with hopes of preventing the virus.  

The CDC is sending $3.6 million Indiana’s way so the state’s health department can better monitor Zika and aid in prevention efforts.

University of California-Santa Barbara Sociology / http://www.soc.ucsb.edu/sexinfo/article/medically-induced-abortions

More women in Indiana are choosing to abort pregnancies with the so-called “abortion pill,” even while the total number of procedures is decreasing in the state.

The vast majority of abortions are done using one of two procedures. So-called “chemical” or “medical” procedures use a pill to abort a fetus at home. “Surgical” abortions, which are also referred to as "suction curettage,” use a vacuum-like device to suction out fetal tissue. Both methods are legal in Indiana and cost approximately the same.

Courtesy Governor Mike Pence

Indiana governor Mike Pence will be in the spotlight tonight as he delivers the keynote speech at the Republican National Convention.

In selecting Pence as his running mate, presidential candidate Donald Trump more than once has touted the corporate tax cuts implemented during Pence’s administration to attract new investment and create jobs.

Pence also has impacted health issues during his nearly four years as governor and 12 years in Congress. 

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Jake Harper looks at the governor’s record on health policy in Indiana.

Craig Zirpolo

More than 500 pharmacies and treatment centers across the state can now distribute naloxone without a prescription under a new standing order from the Indiana state department of health.

The barriers to obtaining the overdose intervention drug have been falling throughout the last decade as the number of drug overdoses related to heroin and other opioids has increased statewide.

HCC Public Information Office / https://www.flickr.com/photos/hagerstowncc/

Indiana health officials are endorsing a new set of guidelines for emergency departments prescribing opioids for acute pain.

The Governor’s Task Force on Drug Enforcement, Treatment and Prevention voted Tuesday to help the Indiana State Medical Association and the Indiana Hospital Association — which wrote the guidelines — distribute the information to the state’s emergency rooms.

Guidance includes when an emergency room doctor should prescribe a painkiller, to whom a doctor should give the medicine and how large a prescription is appropriate.

What Can Indiana Do To Prevent Sexual Assault?

Jun 7, 2016
Daniel Horacio Agostini / https://www.flickr.com/photos/dhammza/

The Indiana State Department of Health is looking to broaden its scope when it comes to preventing sexual violence.

The state has released an updated version of its Sexual Violence Primary Prevention Plan, which focuses on stopping rape before it happens.

Indiana’s last plan, released in 2010, focused on creating connections between state and local agencies, identifying priority populations to target, and finding data-based strategies to help prevent rape.

The new plan maintains similar goals, but opens the door to connecting more people, not just larger agencies.

FrankieLeon / https://www.flickr.com/photos/armydre2008/

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced the range of the mosquito primarily responsible for carrying the Zika virus was more widespread than originally expected. Even though the new map contains Indiana, public health experts say the likelihood for native Hoosier infections is slim.

The primary vector for the Zika virus, the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is found in tropical and semi-tropical climates, but the CDC has warned it could be present in the southern part of Indiana, too.

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