Hoosier Jobs

At Indianapolis-based pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly, 2,300 employees will take buyouts as part of the company’s effort to save money by cutting at least 2,000 jobs in the U.S. by the end of the year.

It’s unclear whether layoffs are still in the works in the Hoosier state.

Lilly said in September it would aim to save $500 million by cutting 3,500 jobs out of its more than 41,000 worldwide, with at least 2,000 cut in the U.S.

 

The latest federal employment numbers show jobs growing more quickly in urban areas than rural ones across the country – despite low unemployment across all regions.

Seventy percent of job growth from 2016 to 2017 was in places with more than a million residents, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Meanwhile, rural places still struggled to create new jobs and maintain their workforces.

In Indiana, data shows 29 counties gaining jobs more slowly than the national rate in the past year, and another 23 losing jobs overall.

Indiana’s unemployment rate rose last month for the first time in five months even as the state’s private sector added jobs.

The Indiana unemployment rate went up 0.1 percent rising to 3.1 percent in July. That’s the first increase since February. But it still keeps the unemployment rate well below the national average and lower than all neighboring states.

Purdue University will help train thousands of new Infosys employees in Indiana and nationwide.

The five-year agreement comes as the technology and consulting company readies a new hub in Indianapolis.

For years, Infosys hired mainly visa workers from overseas. The company said in May it’s shifting course, hiring 10,000 American employees – including 2,000 in Indiana.

Global tech firm Infosys will bring 2,000 jobs to Indiana in what Gov. Eric Holcomb calls a “game-changing announcement.”

Infosys plans to open four hubs across the U.S. in the next few years, hiring 10,000 Americans. One of those hubs – and 2,000 of those jobs – will be in Indiana. Infosys CEO Vishal Sikka says the company’s plans are aimed at stressing local hiring as it adjusts to a constantly evolving tech world,

 

Carroll County will be home to a $350 million, first-of-its-kind recycling plant that will turn old plastic car parts into diesel fuel, officials announced Tuesday.

The GEP Fuel & Energy plant will employ about 250 people in Camden by 2020.

That represents about one job for every four Camden residents – something Jim Staton of the Indiana Economic Development Corporation noted at the packed factory announcement in the town’s community center.

At this weekend's U.S. Conference of Mayors in Indianapolis, leaders from cities big and small are brainstorming ways to collaborate on economic growth, rather than competing.

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg says that approach is already catching on in Indiana.

Outside a session with the mayors of Boston and New York, Buttigieg said his city of 100,000 is just big enough to have all the problems of a major metro area:

 

A Silicon Valley tech company is relocating to Carmel, in what state officials are touting as a win for Indiana's business-friendly climate.

 

San Mateo, Calif.-based Determine uses cloud technology to help companies store and manage contract data from start to finish. Its clients include AOL, Kellogg's and Sony Music Entertainment.

 

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Indiana is seeing a boom in manufacturing job creation – outpacing most of the country. And even more jobs will open up as baby boomers retire.

Many businesses are working harder to fill those jobs with military veterans, like 57-year-old Tim Turner.

Right now, he shares a house on a quiet street northwest of downtown Indianapolis with two other formerly homeless veterans.

Kate Hiscock / https://www.flickr.com/photos/slightlyeverything/

The state’s unemployment remained unchanged between December and January, resting at 4.6 percent – that’s nearly a percentage point less than it was a year ago and better than all of Indiana’s neighboring states.  And, over the past six years, from the height of the recession, Indiana’s unemployment rate dropped more than 6 percent.

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