higher education

Arne Duncan
Courtesy Purdue University

During his visit to Purdue Wednesday as part of his annual “Back to School” bus tour, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan wove together the university’s recent initiatives with his own vision for education accessibility and affordability.

Duncan praised recent moves by the university and President Mitch Daniels such as instituting competency-based degrees, planning to open a charter school and offering a freeze on tuition.

Ivy Tech

The Indiana General Assembly allocated nearly $2 billion for the state’s colleges in this year's budget – including money for new building projects. The only institution that didn’t receive funding for one of those projects is Ivy Tech Community College.    

​Senator Luke Kenley (R-Noblesville) was one of the architects of that $31 billion budget Gov. Mike Pence signed into law. As he was reviewing requests from the state’s colleges for more than $761 million in capital projects, there was a phone call.

Terre Haute Women-Only College Goes Co-Ed

May 19, 2015

Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College is opening its doors to undergraduate male students for the first time in its 175-year history.

The Terre Haute-area school’s Board of Trustees unanimously voted to go co-ed after a year of debate. The decision was partially motivated by a survey that found less than 2-percent of young women are willing to consider attending a women-only college.

Saint Mary-of-the-Woods President Dottie King says the school was not able to make a single-sex learning environment appealing to applicants, despite several attempts to do so.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Indiana Senate leaders Thursday rolled out their version of the state budget, and there are some differences from their House GOP colleagues in a number of key areas:


In total, higher education spending makes up 12-percent of the Senate’s proposed two-year, $31.5 billion budget.

That’s considerably more than what the House suggested.

Senate Appropriations Chair Luke Kenley (R-Noblesville) acknowledges the increase and says it would move state universities in the right direction.

State lawmakers want to help ensure more students leave high school prepared for college classes by moving remediation out of higher education. 

The Senate Education Committee heard testimony Wednesday that 31% of Hoosiers students who graduated high school in 2010 and went on to a public college or university required remediation. 

Ivy Tech Vice President Jeff Terp says students who have to take remedial classes aren’t likely to continue.