higher education

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Purdue University’s enrollment of women in computer science has risen 260-percent in the last five years. Still, the program’s current freshman class is comprised of 22-percent women, which is about on par with the national rate of women in the computing field.

Nearly 10,000 people in Indiana are approved for benefits through Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program – also called DACA – which protects undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children, and thousands more could be eligible, according to the Migration Policy Institute.

The Trump administration confirmed Tuesday it will end DACA in six months, but Hoosier enrollees and advocates hope Congress will intervene before then.

The Indiana Chamber of Commerce’s latest report card on the state economy’s race to the top shows some progress. But a lot of obstacles remain.

The Vision 2025 Plan is basically the Chamber’s policy platform. Chamber president Kevin Brinegar says it lays out the ways Indiana’s economy should succeed.

“We believe, if we can be best of class in each of these areas, that Indiana will have the best chance for competitiveness and prosperity in the 21st-century global economy,” he says.

A new study from Ball State University underscores how higher education can boost wages – especially in certain parts of the state.

Its author, at the Center for Business and Economic Researcher, says the study suggests poorer counties have lots to gain from regional educational partnerships.

Graduate researcher Nathan Law found that since the recession, it’s been easier for Hoosiers with at least a bachelor’s degree to find full-time work.

President Donald Trump’s new executive order on immigration does not apply to people on visas – but there’s another change to the visa program for skilled immigrant workers that could put a strain on foreign hires at Indiana universities.

The temporary change to the H-1B visa program would halt what’s called “premium processing,” which speeds up visa applications for foreign, highly skilled workers.

A new report from the Indiana Commission for Higher Education says a rising number of people are getting educational certificates from two-year Indiana colleges, which may help fill the state’s open manufacturing jobs.

The CHE report focuses on credit-bearing certificates – the kind college students can earn in less than one or two years, from programs that “commonly have a career or occupational focus.”

In Indiana, CHE found a 32 percent increase in production of these certificates since 2012, mostly from two-year public schools like Ivy Tech Community College.

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Top agronomists at Purdue University will be part of a new nationwide higher education task force on food security.

The Association of Public and Land Grant Universities is putting together the 31-member commission, which aims to ensure that the world's rapidly growing population has enough to eat.

It was funded by the Kellogg Foundation to devise research and public education ideas for improving food access and nutrition by 2050, when the global population is set to hit 9 billion.

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A report out this week finds improvement for the number of Indiana high school graduates ready for college. However, the state Commission for Higher Education says the achievement gap for poor and minority students persists.

The commission's annual Indiana College Readiness report found 82 percent of Hoosier students who enrolled in college in 2014 were prepared for coursework -- an improvement of five percentage points.

Vincennes University

 

Vincennes University is teaming up with Indiana manufacturers to recruit more women into tech and engineering jobs.

 

The public school will sponsor 46 women to live in a dedicated dorm while pursuing two-year science, technology, engineering or math degrees next fall.

 

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Public health experts are noting the differences in vaccination requirements at Indiana colleges in the wake of three schools announcing cases of the mumps this year.

For public schools in Indiana, the rules for vaccinations are simple. The law requires anyone attending to have shots protecting them from diptheria, tetanus, measles, mumps and rubella.

But with private schools, it’s a little more complicated, says Ross Silverman, who teaches health policy and management at the IU School of Public Health:

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