Health

Holcomb Wants Medicaid Expansion Continued

Mar 13, 2017

Governor Eric Holcomb says he wants to see Indiana’s Medicaid expansion protected as federal lawmakers debate health care reform.

Legislation unanimously approved by the Senate Health Committee Wednesday will require students at Indiana’s public colleges and universities to receive a meningitis immunization before attending.

Washington State House Republicans / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wahousegop/

The House Republicans’ replacement plan for the Affordable Care Act—otherwise known as Obamacare—would gradually phase out enrollment in Medicaid expansion programs such as Indiana’s Healthy Indiana Plan.

The bill—released earlier this week—aims to let the expansions remain for another three years. Starting in 2020, enrollment would “freeze,” and no new enrollees would be able to join, which would mean the program would gradually lose members.

Approximately 250 thousand people currently have coverage through HIP 2.0.

ae0a1d01-582d-4d1b-85a5-f613aa36e1f3
Eugene Peretz/Flickr

A new study from the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at IUPUI in Indianapolis has found that restricting opioid prescriptions may have an unintended side effect: more overdose deaths involving heroin and fentanyl. The study also shows that Indiana’s reports don’t reflect the actual number of overdose deaths in which opioid drugs are present.

Michael Havens / https://www.flickr.com/photos/128733321@N05/

Almost half of the 95,000 members enrolled in the state’s Hoosier Care Connect health care program will need to switch their plans this month after one of the three companies offering coverage makes its exit.

MDWise, an Indianapolis-based company, announced late last month the company was dropping out of the program.

Leaders at MDWise contend it’s not financially feasible to renew a contract with the state, even though Indiana Family and Social Services Administration spokesman Jim Gavin says the administration’s actuary says the rates are fair.

 

In 2014, Indiana lawmakers established a task force to study neonatal abstinence syndrome, or opioid withdrawal in newborns born dependent on the drugs. They found 20 percent of the sample set was born dependent on opioids.

Director of strategic initiatives at Reid Hospital, Lisa Suttle, says a few years ago staff at in Richmond noticed a trend.

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

A bill moving from the state House to Senate this week would expand the number of vaccinations Indiana’s pharmacists may give to patients. It’s the latest evidence of the profession’s growing role in the healthcare industry, but the possibility the question: Are patients sacrificing quality for convenience?

Pharmacies used to simply be a place where you could pick up your pills — and maybe a cane or a page of stamps. But these days, pharmacy services are expanding.

Elad Rahmin / https://www.flickr.com/photos/eladrahmin/

Deaths from drug overdoses have continued to increase in Indiana, mirroring national trends reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week.

According to the CDC report, the national drug-related death rate has increased more than two and a half times since 1999.

In that same time period, state health department numbers show the number of drug overdose deaths in Indiana has gone up 570 percent. In 2015, 1,236 people died from drug-related OD's.

Abortion Bill Changed After Returning To Committee

Feb 21, 2017

 

A House committee altered and then approved an abortion regulation bill after the unusual step of sending the bill from the House floor back to the committee.

The bill mandates doctors tell patients their medication-induced abortions could be reversed. It also mandates doctors tell patients that no scientifically valid studies verify that practice.

 

A House committee approved a bill that requires doctors to tell patients their medication-induced abortions could be reversed.

The committee also changed the bill to, as one lawmaker put it, “balance out” that language.

In testimony on the measure last week, doctors were split on the reversal of medication-induced abortions. Some supported it, citing individual cases. Others said no scientifically valid studies support those claims.

Pages