Health

 

In 2014, Indiana lawmakers established a task force to study neonatal abstinence syndrome, or opioid withdrawal in newborns born dependent on the drugs. They found 20 percent of the sample set was born dependent on opioids.

Director of strategic initiatives at Reid Hospital, Lisa Suttle, says a few years ago staff at in Richmond noticed a trend.

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

A bill moving from the state House to Senate this week would expand the number of vaccinations Indiana’s pharmacists may give to patients. It’s the latest evidence of the profession’s growing role in the healthcare industry, but the possibility the question: Are patients sacrificing quality for convenience?

Pharmacies used to simply be a place where you could pick up your pills — and maybe a cane or a page of stamps. But these days, pharmacy services are expanding.

Elad Rahmin / https://www.flickr.com/photos/eladrahmin/

Deaths from drug overdoses have continued to increase in Indiana, mirroring national trends reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week.

According to the CDC report, the national drug-related death rate has increased more than two and a half times since 1999.

In that same time period, state health department numbers show the number of drug overdose deaths in Indiana has gone up 570 percent. In 2015, 1,236 people died from drug-related OD's.

Abortion Bill Changed After Returning To Committee

Feb 21, 2017

 

A House committee altered and then approved an abortion regulation bill after the unusual step of sending the bill from the House floor back to the committee.

The bill mandates doctors tell patients their medication-induced abortions could be reversed. It also mandates doctors tell patients that no scientifically valid studies verify that practice.

 

A House committee approved a bill that requires doctors to tell patients their medication-induced abortions could be reversed.

The committee also changed the bill to, as one lawmaker put it, “balance out” that language.

In testimony on the measure last week, doctors were split on the reversal of medication-induced abortions. Some supported it, citing individual cases. Others said no scientifically valid studies support those claims.

Baby Box Legalization Effort Halted In Committee

Feb 13, 2017

 

An effort to legalize baby boxes in Indiana was halted in a Senate committee hearing about the boxes, which are meant to provide mothers an extra layer of anonymity when dropping off unwanted newborns.

Martha Soukup / https://www.flickr.com/photos/soukup/5159006395

A Purdue University research team hopes to use science, not just anecdotes, to prove dogs really are man’s best friend.

The researchers are conducting a years-long study that measures service dogs’ effect on humans, both emotionally and mentally.

Assistant professor of human-animal interaction Maggie O’Haire says part of the next phase is measuring levels of a stress hormone called cortisol.

Jim Grey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mobilene/

If Indianapolis-based insurance company Anthem wants to appeal a federal judge’s decision scrapping the company’s upcoming merger with fellow insurer Cigna, it may have a short time window in which to do so.

While the U.S. Justice Department’s suit contained many anti-competitive claims against the merger, Wednesday’s decision only concerns competition in one market — big companies with more than 5,000 employees. In this market, health insurers often offer so-called “Administrative Services Only” contracts, with the companies paying for actual services themselves.

Bill Aims To Limit Opioid Prescriptions

Feb 8, 2017

A proposal that would limit opioid prescriptions passed a Senate committee Wednesday. It is one of 15 measures authored by Sen. Jim Merritt that aim to combat the opioid epidemic.

The bill would limit the prescriptions amount to seven days for first time adult patients and children. Trauma surgeon Dr. Brian Brewer is one of two people who testified that, in his field, that is too limiting.

Doctors Split In Testimony On Abortion Bill

Feb 8, 2017

 

A House committee heard public testimony on a bill that would require abortion providers to tell patients their medication-induced abortions could be reversible.

Some doctors support that bill, while others call it scientifically unsound.

Indianapolis OB-GYN Dr. Katherine McHugh says there’ve been no medically recognized studies regarding medication abortion reversals.

“Please do not confuse a medical gamble with vetted, scientific data,” McHugh says.

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