Health

Sarah Fentem / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Carolyn Kelso and her husband Robert live in a big house north of Indianapolis, with original paintings on the wall and furry throws on the furniture. Carolyn herself is 71, with short blonde hair and stylish chunky black glasses. 

She and her husband take their health seriously, and her mother suffered from Alzheimer’s, so she noticed right away when something was wrong.

“I’d get to the car and go down to the corner, and couldn’t remember where I was going, couldn’t remember if I was going left or right,” Carolyn Kelso says.

 

East Chicago’s lead crisis came up Thursday at Ben Carson’s confirmation hearing to lead the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Carson, the retired neurosurgeon from Detroit tapped by President-elect Donald Trump to lead HUD, was answering a question from U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.).

Donnelly asked if Carson would continue HUD’s response to lead contamination in an East Chicago public housing complex.

Lawmakers Aim To Reduce Cervical Cancer Deaths

Jan 11, 2017

 

About 250 Hoosier women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year, and about 85 die from the disease.

Those numbers have remained stagnant in Indiana, despite advances in prevention and screening. Republican Reps. Sharon Negele and Holli Sullivan filed a bill to address this.

Negele says the proposal would require the Indiana State Department of Health to develop a plan identifying barriers and crafting recommendations to reduce the number of deaths.

Trey Pennington / https://www.flickr.com/photos/treypennington/

Eric Holcomb has signed an executive order creating a position within his office to oversee all state agencies involved with drug prevention and treatment efforts.

Retired Goodwill Industries of Central Indiana CEO Jim McClelland will serve as the new Director for Drug Prevention, Treatment and Enforcement. In that role, he’ll be in charge of overseeing the drug-related efforts of nine Indiana agencies, including the Department of Health, the Professional Licensing Agency and the Family and Social Services Administration.

Proposal Would Mandate Ultrasound Before Abortion

Jan 10, 2017

A new abortion bill proposed in the Indiana legislature would require women look and listen to an ultrasound before having an abortion. Current law allows women to opt out.

The bill, authored by Republican Sen. Dennis Kruse, would mean a woman seeking an abortion could no longer waive the requirement she view an ultrasound and listen to the fetus’ heartbeat. Kruse declined requests for an interview but said in a statement that he authored the bill to prevent abortions of unborn Hoosier children.

Steve Burns / WTIU

Tippecanoe County officials may be coalescing around the idea of using a mobile unit to house the county’s recently-approved syringe services program.

Three new school-based telehealth clinics are opening in Indiana this week. The effort to increase access to healthcare for children in rural Indiana started when the states first school telehealth clinic opened four months ago in Elwood.

The three newest clinics are opening in the southern part of the state in Crothersville, Austin and Southwestern Jefferson County.

Ed Schipul / https://www.flickr.com/photos/eschipul/

Workplace injuries fell 5 percent in 2015 in Indiana. The year is now tied with 2013 as the year with the lowest on-the-job injury rate since the federal government began recording 25 years ago.

According to the Indiana Department of Labor, 3.8 people per every hundred were injured or contracted work-related illnesses last year.

Robert S. Donovan / https://www.flickr.com/photos/booleansplit/

According to the Indiana Department of Labor, the injury and illness rate of the state’s agricultural workers increased almost 30 percent between 2014 and 2015. But the numbers—from the state’s annual Survey of Occupational Illnesses and Injuries—don’t tell the whole story.

Wikimedia Commons / https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Medicine#/media/File:Stress_test.jpg

Even though many Hoosiers will be facing increased prices and fewer options on the Affordable Care Act’s federal health insurance exchange next year, Indiana’s enrollment for 2017 is still up by more than 9 thousand people.

According to figures released Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 119 thousand Hoosiers have signed up for insurance on healthcare.gov for coverage beginning January 1, a nearly 9 percent increase.

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