Health

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Gretchen Frazee / WTIU News

Several weeks before Indiana’s state health commissioner Jerome Adams was nominated to replace Vivek Murthy as U.S. Surgeon General, Adams toured a detox center in Indianapolis with Justin Phillips, founder of Overdose Lifeline - a grassroots organization focused on preventing opioid deaths. “I asked him to accompany me to see first hand some of the treatment and recovery work that's being done within Indianapolis,” says Phillips .

 

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Governor Tom Wolf/FLICKR / https://www.flickr.com/photos/governortomwolf/

Medicaid spending on three important medications used to treat opioid addiction increased 136 percent nationwide between 2011 and 2016, according to a new report from the Urban Institute, a public policy think tank based in Washington D.C. The increases were much higher in some states—in seven states, rates rose more than 400 percent.

New legislation to provide more families access to hearing aids went into effect July 1. The Hearing Aid Assistance Program of Indiana (HAAPI) now includes younger children in the program and an increase in funding.

HAAPI has been helping Hoosier families afford hearing aids using state funding since 2014. Lawmakers this year included children 3 and up into the program; before it was kindergarten.

Christine Moody, executive director for the state’s Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Education says the changes to the program aim to help more Hoosiers.

Eli Lilly is partnering with Pfizer to help develop a new drug that could be the first of a new class of non-opioid pain medications.

There hasn’t been a new pain medication discovery in about 50 years. The last new non-opioid pain medication to hit the market was ibuprofen in the late 1960s.

That’s a problem, because Indiana University Health’s Daniel Rusyniak says when it comes to the treatment of chronic pain we need more options.

courtesy National Cancer Institute

As he prepares to exit the job he’s held for the last two years, interim National Cancer Institute Director Doug Lowy visited Purdue Thursday as part of a survey of Indiana college research initiatives.

Lowy had spent time earlier in the week visiting Indiana University’s Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis and giving an update on the first year of former Vice President Joe Biden’s so-called “cancer moonshot” funding – much of which he says is still slated to go to places like Big Ten Universities.

Legislation Aims To Increase Addiction Providers

Jun 29, 2017

More than half of Indiana counties don’t have mental health care options available. A new bipartisan proposal in Congress to increase the number of providers specializing in addiction treatment.

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) says many Hoosiers, just like many in America, are battling addiction to opioids and other dangerous substances. And he says there’s s a need for more professionals on the front lines.

Older Hoosiers Express Concerns Over Health Bill

Jun 29, 2017

Nearly 14,000 callers from around Indiana took part in a telephone town hall about the Senate health care bill with U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.). The call was organized by AARP Indiana, which strongly opposes the measure.

Their opposition to the health care reform bill stems from worries about increased costs and reduced benefits.

Donnelly says he has the same concerns.

Nathan Forget / flickr.com/photos/nathanf/

Even though the number of hepatitis C cases in Tippecanoe County has doubled since 2013, location concerns keep blocking implementation of a syringe exchange program that could help stem the spread of disease.

That was the message from a Wednesday night meeting in Lafayette on the county’s battle against addiction and its ancillary health issues.

Indiana State Department of Health Chief Medical Consultant Dr. Joan Duwve  says hepatitis C is much easier to transmit than HIV, which is another concern that follows opioid epidemics.

More than 50 people gathered outside Republican U.S. Senator Todd Young’s Indianapolis office today for what’s known as a “die in.”  The protest centered on the Republican health care bill.

The group held painted grave markers and laid down on the side walk outside Young’s downtown office building.

Catherine Osborne drove from South Bend to be at the event. She’s worried about the future of Medicaid.

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Sarah Fentem and Lauren Chapman / Side Effects Public Media

As Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell works to drum up votes for his health care bill in Congress, people in his home state worry about what they could lose if the bill passes.

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