Health Officials: No Cancer Cluster In Johnson County

Dec 1, 2015
Yale Rosen /

The State Health Department and the Department of Environmental Management say they have not found enough evidence to link cases of child cancer around Franklin to a cancer cluster.

ISDH officials say they studied numerous factors, and IDEM studied water, soil, and other factors but found nothing in the area that would be cancer-causing.

There had been concern among some residents that contaminated water was leading to an increase in the number of cases of childhood cancer.

AJ Cann /

The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana has filed another lawsuit against the state, this time against the Family and Social Services Administration. 

​The newest lawsuit is over Medicaid payments for Hepatitis C treatment.

There is a cure for Hepatitis C, but it can cost as much $100,000. Medicaid programs can get the drugs for cheaper, but they're still expensive. So, to limit the burden on the state, there are requirements. Patients have to have a certain level of liver damage. Or they have to also be infected with HIVr before Medicaid will pay for the treatment.

Andrew Malone /

An Indiana University health policy expert says insurance companies might deal a big blow to Obamacare.

Last week, UnitedHealth Group, the nation's largest health insurer, said it might withdraw from the Affordable Care Act's health exchanges after next year if it was unable to turn around what it calls huge financial losses.

While state and federal exchanges only make up a small percentage of the company's business, United says it will lose $700-million on them this year and next.

Jessica Lucia /

Police and prosecutors are renewing a call to require a prescription for cold remedies containing psuedoephedrine.

The decongestant is a key ingredient in methamphetamine. Indiana already limits how much pseudoephedrine a person can buy at once, and maintains a database of how much has been purchased. Police, though, argue the rise in the number of Hoosier meth labs has been unimpeded.

Sharan /

Every year, states with their own occupational safety and health agencies are reviewed by the federal OSHA. 

The latest audit of Indiana’s agency, IOSHA (which is charged with ensuring the safety of all places of employment in the state, minus federal workers and certain maritime and agricultural operations), has shown that in 2014, the agency took 14 times longer than the national average to respond to complaints and only completed a little more than half the number necessary to meet its workplace inspection goal.

Indiana State Department of Health / Facebook

Indiana health officials say the key to reducing the state's chronically high infant mortality rates is to improve infant death rates among minorities.

Indiana needs to cut its infant death rate by one-sixth in five years to reach a federal goal of holding the rate to six deaths for every thousand live births. The mortality rate among whites is already at that goal, but babies born to African-American Hoosiers are two-and-a-half times more likely to die before their first birthday.

Rusty Clark /

Being mom’s favorite might sound great – but Purdue social scientists have discovered it sometimes comes with a large price.

Researchers studied families for 16 years as part of the longitudinal Within Family Differences Study, which explores relationships among different generations of families. Their most recent findings show adult children who perceive themselves as a mother’s favorite are more likely to exhibit signs of depression.

Department of Neuroscience / Washington University School of Medicine

More than two dozen residents of Henry County have been diagnosed with a rare form of brain cancer since 1999 and they want to know why. However, a state health department investigation may find that the cases aren’t linked by anything but chance.

As a cancer, glioblastoma is rare.  Which makes it strange that since 1999, 26 people have been diagnosed with the highly malignant brain tumors in Henry County.

State health officials Friday were pressed into releasing numbers showing a statewide increase in the number of syphilis cases, after the Tippecanoe County Health Department announced a spike.

Tippecanoe County has seen 12 cases of the sexually transmitted disease this year. That’s a big increase over the last four years – none of which registered even five cases for the whole year.

Flickr Creative Commons /

Attorney General Greg Zoeller says a new grant program to provide overdose intervention drugs to first responders will help save lives as Indiana braces for what he fears is a coming heroin crisis. 

Naloxone is a drug that immediately halts the effects of an opioid overdose, such as heroin.  55 of Indiana’s nearly 500 law enforcement agencies are trained and equipped with the drug.