Health

IU Research: Biomarkers Could Help Prevent Suicide

Aug 17, 2017

New research helps identify people at risk for suicide using so-called biomarkers in blood tests. The study promotes what’s called precision medicine to help prevent suicide.

Indiana University School of Medicine researcher Alexader Niculescu’s years of research uses biology to determine who is more at risk of dying from suicide. He says it’s really no different then the work cardiologists do to prevent heart attacks.

A new partnership aims to provide members of the Indiana National Guard with mental health and substance abuse care. Indiana National Guard behavioral health officer Maj. Scott Edwards says the program called “Mission Recovery,” tailored to service member’s needs.

“So when service members come they are meeting with a provider who understands more about the realities of being a military member,” Edwards says. “That’s hugely important for us and it’s key to the success in any kind of initiative where people come to get help for mental health or substance abuse problems.”

Study: Food Outlet Proximity Not Related To Obesity

Aug 14, 2017

Researchers say a new study on whether a person’s proximity to certain food options causes obesity sets itself apart from past projects.

The findings indicate policies to reduce the number of fast food places or even open more markets will not likely reduce obesity. Indiana University environmental affairs professor Coady Wing was part of a team of researchers involved in a recent study.

Welcome To The Summer Camp For Kids Impacted By HIV

Aug 14, 2017


The Tataya Mato week at Indianapolis’ Jameson Camp is a free sleepaway camp for children impacted by HIV/AIDS. (Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting)

It’s a sleep away camp. It’s free. And once a summer the Jameson Camp in Indianapolis hosts a session for campers with this in common: Either they or a family member have HIV/AIDS.

The goal? Use summer camp to help children process their struggles with the disease.

ZaldyImg / https://www.flickr.com/photos/8499561@N02/

Tippecanoe County Health Department officials Friday tried to bar reporters from the public building where the county’s needle exchange had begun operating.

Reporters were able to talk with public health nurse Khala Hochstedler until a few minutes before 1 p.m. Friday, when she claimed they had to leave the building.

But because Tippecanoe County decided to start its program over the objections of Lafayette and West Lafayette officials, it had to be in a county-owned space – one that, by definition, is open to the public.

Hoosier Family Helps Push 'Right To Try' Nationally

Aug 10, 2017

A “Right To Try” bill that allows families to use prescription drugs that don’t have full FDA approval passed the U.S. Senate last week with unanimous support. U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) helped author the legislation, modeled after an Indiana state law, with encouragement from a Hoosier mother and her son.

Jordan McLinn, 8, became the face of Indiana’s “Right To Try” bill in 2015. Last year his mother, Laura McLinn, visited Donnelly to lobby for a federal version.

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Wikimedia Commons

One of the first Indiana counties to implement a syringe exchange is now the first in the state to effectively shut its program down.

Gretchen Frazee / IPBS

After months of struggling to secure a location, the Tippecanoe County Health Department plans to inaugurate a needle exchange program in its building this Friday. 

The program comes nearly a year after a public health emergency was issued for the county.

A partnership between food banks and Ivy Tech is providing healthy produce to people around the state. The sweet corn project began two years ago when Ivy Tech’s Terre Haute campus launched a hands-on field experiment for students.

The Terre Haute agriculture program teaches modern farming technology. Its corn yield kept growing so the campus donated to local food banks.

Becky Miller with the Ivy Tech Foundation says, this summer, students planted three different fields.

The latest assessment from the American Cancer Society details where Indiana lags and what progress it’s made in cancer fighting policies. The American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network annual progress report evaluates state legislative efforts.

American Cancer Society’s Bryan Hannon says failure to pass a cigarette tax increase last session set Indiana back in reducing smoking rates. But he says a modest funding increase for tobacco control programs was a step in the right direction.

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