Health

Planned Parenthood in Merrillville is able to provide abortions again after halting those services for a couple weeks.

A majority of former football players suffer from a degenerative brain condition. That’s according to a new study in the Journal of American Medicine. The condition is linked to concussions, but Indiana experts say it shouldn’t be cause for concern for all players.

Indiana University Health psychiatrist and neuroscience expert Thomas McAllister says the condition chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE is a type of dementia.

“And it’s been linked to people with certain head injuries,” says McAllister

Whooping Cough Cases On The Rise In Indiana

Jul 28, 2017

Twice the number of whooping cough cases have been recorded compared to this time last year and the Indiana State Department of Health is investigating. Outbreak supervisor Shawn Richards says

“One, is what we’re seeing normal?” says Richards. “Two, are there epidemiological links to other schools or states?”

For the first half of the year, 136 cases of pertussis or whooping cough have been reported compared to 66 in 2016.

The state says the increase could be due to more cases being reported or a waning vaccine. Richards says it could also be something else.

Annie Ropeik/IPB News

 

One year ago, East Chicago Mayor Anthony Copeland told residents of the West Calumet Housing Complex they had to move out because of lead and arsenic contamination.

The announcement sparked a year of frantic action from residents, public officials, activists, and lawyers that's still ongoing.

In Blood, Lead & Soil: A Year In East Chicagoa special hour of coverage from Indiana Public Broadcasting, our reporters look at the past year of the crisis and take stock of what's ahead.

Gov. Eric Holcomb continues to avoid specifics when it comes to the impact federal health care reform could have on the state.

Holcomb sent a “Letter to Hoosiers” Monday to outline what he wants from federal health care reform. That includes greater state control over the issue. But he declined to share specific data on how federal health care legislation debated in the Senate would affect Indiana.

A Planned Parenthood clinic in northwest Indiana has halted abortions because of a state law that involves doctors’ admitting privileges marking the first time the state has used the law to stop services.

In a letter earlier this month the Indiana State Department of Health told the Merrillville Planned Parenthood to stop performing abortions because a doctor with admitting privileges had ended their relationship with the clinic.

Older patients leaving hospitals and then nursing facilities have a better chance of staying at home if they receive an in-home visit soon after discharge according to a recent study from the IU Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute.

The report finds home health visits within a month reduce the risk of returning to a hospital by almost half.  Assistant professor Dr. Jennifer Carnahan says the goal is to keep people out of the health care system.

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Sarah Fentem

A new study shows some people are still afraid to call 911 when helping an overdose victim, despite an Indiana law that permits friends and bystanders to administer the overdose antidote naloxone.

More than a quarter of people surveyed by two researchers at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis said they didn’t call 911 at the scene of an overdose for fear of arrest.

For Pro-Obamacare Groups, A Wary Reprieve

Jul 18, 2017
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Tedd Eytan / https://www.flickr.com/photos/taedc/

Health care advocacy groups are tentatively celebrating news that the Senate’s latest health care bill is dead. But after months of protesting the GOP’s plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act, they’re still not calling it a victory.  

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Elliot Englert / for Side Effects Public Media

The public has weighed in on Indiana’s proposal to add a work requirement to its unique Medicaid program, the Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0.  More than 40 people submitted their opinions to the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as of July 18, showing overwhelming disapproval of the proposal.

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