grain bins

Indiana grain farmers are hustling to keep up with harvest as fall progresses.

The soybean crop is on pace with the five-year average as of this week, according to the USDA. But corn is less than half harvested, which is well below average for this time of year.

That’s put large operations like White Oak Farms in Putnam County under the gun to get their corn out of the field before it spoils.

Large Crops Not Translating To Large Bankrolls For Farmers

Nov 20, 2014
David Wright / https://www.flickr.com/photos/dhwright/14934151279

The truck traffic at Kokomo Grain Company is constant.

"We will process between 400 and 500 trucks a day in the 12-14 hour day at this facility," says Senior Grain Merchandiser Mike Silver.

He says all of the truckloads of corn and soybeans can add up to 750,000 bushels per day. Trucks dump the grain quickly, but a long line soon snakes around the Kokomo Grain’s entrance.

Indiana and several other Midwestern states are poised to break records with this year’s yields, so the grain elevators here are already halfway full.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Inside a garage at a building near the Purdue University Airport sits a dump truck, full to the brim with dried corn. It’s not a grain bin, but it’s a useful stand-in for an exercise first responders from around the area are about to stage.

The EMTs, volunteer firefighters and other lifesavers have come to Purdue to learn from perhaps the world’s pre-eminent experts on grain bin entrapments.