Graduation Rates

IDOE Asks Public To Comment On Federal Waiver Request

Nov 25, 2017

Graduation rates at some Indiana high schools could plummet due to a new federal definition of regular diplomas. It would prohibit schools from including students who earn the general diploma in calculated graduation rates. Instead, federal guidelines would only count students who earn the Core 40 diploma or above.

General diplomas require fewer math, social studies and science credits – and less testing.

A state committee recommended sweeping changes to high school graduation requirements Tuesday even as many of the details remain unknown.

If approved by the State Board of Education students, starting with the class of 2023, would choose from multiple academic tracts to satisfy three graduation requirements that are designed to better prepare them for college or career.

Indiana’s proposed federal education plan has been published online and it is now in the hands of Gov. Eric Holcomb.

Indiana is required to submit a new federal education plan this year as part of the Every Student Succeeds Act, which replaced the No Child Left Behind law in 2015.

READ MORE: Indiana Plan Under the Every Student Succeeds Act

The plan includes the state’s academic standards, how students will be tested on those standards and plans to help to failing schools.

McCormick Responds To New Federal Graduation Rate Requirements

Jul 12, 2017

A new federal education law would make thousands of diplomas known as general diplomas no longer count toward a school’s graduation rate. It’s a move that Indiana’s schools chief says “blindsided” the state.

“Obviously the state recognizes those diplomas, employers are recognizing those diplomas,” says Jennifer McCormick, Indiana superintendent of public instruction. “This will just make it more problematic.”

Indiana To Change How It Calculates Graduation Rates

Jul 7, 2017

Indiana’s general diploma will no longer be considered when calculating school and district graduation rates, state officials announced Friday.

In a memo to principals and superintendents, the state said it will also no longer count students who earn general diplomas in the state’s A-F rating system.

High School Grad Rates Up Nationally, Down In Indiana

Oct 18, 2016
Dave Herholz / https://www.flickr.com/photos/dherholz/

Federal officials announced this week the national high school graduation rate reached an all-time high of 83-percent for the 2014-2015 school year.

But while the rate is up nationally, Indiana’s graduation rate decreased for the first time since 2010.

During the 2013–2014 school year, Indiana’s four-year high school graduation rate was 87.9 percent. One year later, during the 2014-15 school year, the graduation rate is down to 87.1 percent.

Elle Moxley / StateImpact Indiana

A panel of school leaders and state education experts met for the first time on Monday to map Indiana’s path to compliance with the Every Student Succeeds Act. The federal government passed ESSA earlier this year, replacing No Child Left Behind.

ESSA requires states submit their plans to meet the new benchmarks. State superintendent Glenda Ritz assembled the 15-person panel to create recommendations for this plan.

It includes state goals for various education factors, including English language instruction, graduation rates, and student achievement on state tests.

Ivy Tech President Tom Snyder To Step Down

Sep 10, 2015
Indiana Public Media

Ivy Tech Community College President Tom Snyder, who's led the statewide network of two-year schools since 2007, will retire next year.

The Ivy Tech Board of Trustees approved a transition contract today that lets Snyder step down about a year before his current contract ends in mid-2017.

Under Snyder’s eight-year tenure, Ivy Tech has become the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system.

Board Chairwoman Paula Hughes says details on a search committee to find a new president will be announced soon.

Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech officials say they welcome a state-ordered review of the school’s programs.

Legislators instructed the Commission for Higher Education to examine which degree programs have the lowest graduation rates, and either restructure or eliminate them.

Ivy Tech president Tom Snyder says the studies which alarmed legislators – including one showing only four-percent of students graduate in four years -- predate changes the school has made over the last seven years to address graduation issues.

WFIU Public Radio / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wfiupublicradio/

Indiana‘s higher education commissioner says Ivy Tech‘s anemic on-time graduation rates are partly a case of growing pains.

Just 4-percent of Ivy Tech students earn their degrees in four years. Even after six years, the figure is just 28-percent -- well below the figures for community colleges in other states.

Teresa Lubbers notes Ivy Tech evolved from a vocational school to a state community college network just 10 years ago. And she says the school receives a higher percentage of students who need remedial work on basic skills.

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