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What A (Sun)day: Sunday Alcohol Sales Begin

Mar 5, 2018
Samantha Horton / IPB News

For other states it was just another Sunday.

Hoosiers commemorated an historic day by buying a cold one.

At 11:52 a.m., the first car pulls into the Village Bottle Shoppe on Sagamore Parkway in West Lafayette.

It’s eight minutes until the liquor stores opens its doors on a Sunday for the first time in state history.

Political analyst John Ketzenberger says the crowd assembling at this and other package stores is due to a cultural shift.

Brandon Smith / IPB News

Independent consultants investigating the Department of Child Services have identified significant potential shortages in the agency.

The consultants’ second public update shows possible challenges in legal representation, worker qualifications, and services.

Brandon Smith / IPB News

Republican leaders say they halted gun bills in each chamber Thursday to avoid debate on several gun regulation proposals.

Lawmakers say they plan to revive some of the language in those bills before the session ends.

Eric Norris / flickr.com/photos/sfxeric/3964596491

West Lafayette is gearing up to sue opioid manufacturers and distributors – joining a long list of U.S. cities going after painkiller producers in the courtroom.

More than a dozen manufacturers are to be named in the lawsuit, including Johnson & Johnson, Allergan and Purdue Pharma. They’re some of the companies responsible for such drugs as Norco and Oxycontin. The city will allege those companies, in its words, “deceptively marketed” opioids.

Opiate distributors will also be named in the lawsuit, alleging those parties failed to report and stop high-quantity orders.

Sunday Alcohol Sales Signed Into Law

Mar 1, 2018
Samantha Horton / IPB News

In front of media, staffers and legislators, Gov. Eric Holcomb signed the bill into law. Holcomb says the bill is giving the consumers what they want.

“This is just yet another example where the State of Indiana has sought to, and indeed modernized, our laws to meet consumer expectation,” Holcomb says.

As expected, Hoosiers will be able to purchase alcohol on Sundays, starting this weekend.

“There is absolutely no need to any longer to make run for the border if you’re a Hoosier or a Hoosier at heart,” Holcomb says.

David Shankbone / Wikimedia Commons

A Senate panel voted Wednesday to get rid of proposed alcohol regulations that would have governed where alcohol is housed in stores and who’s legally allowed to ring it up.

Some advocates decry the elimination of what they call safeguards the same day the governor signed a bill expanding alcohol sales to Sundays.

The proposed bill would have required all cashiers conducting alcohol sales to be at least 21-years-old. But a Senate committee stripped out that provision.

Brandon Smith / IPB News

Health care providers across the state will be subject to new reporting requirements when it comes to complications from abortions.

That’s under legislation approved by the House Wednesday.

The bill creates a long list of potential abortion complications physicians, hospitals, and clinics must report to the state. It includes everything from blood clots and cardiac arrest to anxiety and sleeping disorders.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

Legislation approved by the Senate Tuesday creates a new crime to charge drug dealers with higher penalties if the person they deliver those drugs to overdoses and dies. But some lawmakers worry the measure will ensnare otherwise innocent people.

Brandon Smith / IPB News

A Senate committee made changes Tuesday to a bill regulating autonomous vehicles. The bill’s Senate sponsor says the amendment seeks to find a middle ground between self-driving car manufacturers and those who want tighter controls on the industry.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

Indiana House lawmakers took steps Tuesday to ensure recipients of the federal immigration program known as DACA will be able to receive and renew professional licenses.

The Indiana Professional Licensing Agency recently changed its applications to better comply with a 2011 state immigration law. The move meant thousands of DACA recipients were barred from professional licenses.

Rep. Ed Clere (R-New Albany) says PLA is only following state law – but that law has serious consequences.

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