Government

Government News

deepfruit / https://www.flickr.com/photos/slippek/

Tippecanoe County has received about one-fourth of the grant money it requested to fund a syringe exchange services program aimed at slowing the spread of Hepatitis C among I-V drug users.

Commissioner Tracy Brown says the county accepted an $8,500 grant from the Health Foundation of Greater Indianapolis.

The county had asked for nearly $33,000.

But Brown insists that’s a good first step toward obtaining cash to buy supplies for the program that, under state law, cannot be funded with taxpayer dollars.

Around 50 people gathered at Purdue University Thursday to protest President Trump’s immigration ban. The demonstration was on behalf of a large percentage of immigrant Purdue students who hail from one of the seven countries included in the order.


Photo: Barbara Brosher

Jeff Staker asks the Veterans' Affairs committee to support his push for legalizing the use of medical marijuana.

The American Legion of Indiana could consider a resolution this weekend that would encourage state lawmakers to develop a medical marijuana program.

Gov. Eric Holcomb says he hopes President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration doesn’t affect Indiana’s “welcoming environment.”

President Trump’s executive order suspends all refugee resettlement and bans anyone from seven nations from entering the country. Parts of that order have been halted by federal courts.

Lawmakers Confident In Hoosier State Rail Line Funding

Jan 30, 2017

 

As lawmakers grapple with funding the state’s roads and bridges, many communities don’t want them to forget another mode of transportation: rail. And Republican leaders say the Hoosier State Rail Line’s future in the next two-year state budget should be secure.

Lawmakers provided $6 million in the last two-year budget for the Hoosier State Line from Indianapolis to Chicago. The money came from a one-time source, the state’s tax amnesty program.

Drew Daudelin/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Hundreds rallied Sunday at the Indianapolis International Airport to support refugees and immigrants temporarily banned from entering the country.

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Drew Daudelin reports, many who attended are anxious about what comes next.

Hanna Omar was born and raised in New York and lives in Columbus, Indiana. Her parents are from Yemen, one of seven countries whose citizens are temporarily banned from entering the U.S.

 

Republican lawmakers faced questions and doubts about their proposals to raise fuel taxes at a town hall meeting, from a crowd that is normally supportive of them.

The town hall – held in Carmel, a wealthy, northern suburb of Indianapolis – was organized by Americans for Prosperity-Indiana, a fiscally conservative group. AFP-Indiana strongly opposes the fuel tax increases in the House GOP road funding plan.

Brad Perkins / https://www.flickr.com/photos/br5ad/17080942598

Small Indiana cities struggling to fight back against blight and deadbeat landlords may get another tool this legislative session.

Last year, lawmakers allowed the use of so-called “land banks” for medium-size, or Class II, cities. But smaller Class III cities were not afforded the same right. A similar bill this year would change that.

Land banking lets cities scoop up delinquent properties in hopes of selling them to developers who will take care of the land and make it profitable again.

Holcomb: "The State Of Our State Is Sound"

Jan 17, 2017

 

 

 

Gov. Eric Holcomb used his State of the State address to make another pitch for creating a long-term, sustainable road funding plan. But he also continues to avoid specifics on how to pay for that plan.

Legislative leaders have said they want the governor to be a strong voice for the tax increases that are likely to be part of the road funding plan. Holcomb only says that if the state asks Hoosiers to invest more in their infrastructure, the return will be worth it.

Barbara Brosher / WFIU

 

Several of Indiana’s Congressional Representatives are once again co-sponsoring legislation that would repeal the Medical Device Tax.

Several Indiana companies have been pushing for a repeal of the tax that took effect in 2013.

Congress passed a two-year suspension of the 2.3 percent excise tax at the end of 2015.

But Indiana medical device manufacturers are still operating with a level of uncertainty about what will happen beyond that.

Pages