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U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) was one of just six U.S. Senators invited to a White House dinner Tuesday to discuss President Donald Trump’s tax reform agenda.

Political analysts say Donnelly’s inclusion is a boost to his reelection campaign.

In a statement, Donnelly called the dinner a “good conversation.” He focused on his proposal to address outsourced jobs and use tax reform to punish companies that send positions overseas while rewarding those who return jobs to the U.S.

Flickr.com / https://www.flickr.com/photos/75905404@N00/

The Tippecanoe County Council will consider adding positions to the Public Defender’s office to counter rising costs in the county’s juvenile court.

To deal with an influx of cases over the past few years, the juvenile court has hired local lawyers to represent clients. When all local attorneys had been tapped, Judge Faith Graham says the court went to surrounding counties.

Indiana continues to struggle in its new fiscal year as revenues came in below expectations in August.

Total state tax collections came in about $18 million off the mark in August. That puts the state more than $40 million behind projections this fiscal year.

Sales and corporate tax revenues continue to struggle. Corporate taxes in particular suffered last month, $31 million less than expected, which is about 700 percent below target.

A special study committee to consider the elimination Indiana’s handgun license requirements took more public testimony Thursday. It was the second of three scheduled meetings on the issue and reports the debate played out largely unchanged from the past several years.

Dozens of Hoosiers on either side of the debate showed up to testify about allowing people to carry guns in Indiana without a license.

Gov. Holcomb Defers To Congress On DACA Action

Sep 6, 2017

Gov. Eric Holcomb isn’t saying if Indiana will take any action around Hoosiers with DACA status, given to undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children.

About 10,000 people in Indiana have that status, out of 800,000 nationwide. But President Donald Trump said this week the program will end and that status will be revoked in six months without Congressional intervention.

Nearly 10,000 people in Indiana are approved for benefits through Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program – also called DACA – which protects undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children, and thousands more could be eligible, according to the Migration Policy Institute.

The Trump administration confirmed Tuesday it will end DACA in six months, but Hoosier enrollees and advocates hope Congress will intervene before then.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Recent years have been both the best of pines and the worst of pines for Greater Lafayette. Both cities have been named a Tree City USA, but bugs have decimated some species. But, not wanting to rest on those laurels, Lafayette’s Urban Forester Tim Detzner came up with the Dickens-named project.

“We should probably apologize to him for that,” Detzner says.

State lawmakers are discussing whether to a change a 2011 law that prohibits young people brought into the country illegally from accessing in-state tuition at public colleges.

Indiana is one of only three states in the country that specifically makes immigrant students who can not prove state residency or who don’t qualify for a federal program to pay the more expensive out-of-state tuition rate.

Study Committee Considers Automatic Voter Registration

Aug 30, 2017

Members of a legislative study committee Wednesday debated the merits of automatic voter registration. The discussion was part of an examination of election laws’ impact on voter participation.

Ten states in the country have some form of automatic voter registration. In most of them, citizens are registered to vote while doing other business at the BMV.

Advocates say the system could increase voter turnout.

Lawmakers Recommend Delay On New Guardianship Program

Aug 30, 2017

Indiana lawmakers Tuesday recommended a delay in implementation of a new program that would serve as an alternative to guardianships.

When someone is deemed incapable of making certain legal decisions, a guardian is chosen or appointed to help.

The General Assembly is weighing a program called supportive decision-making, in which guardianship becomes less of a binary decision. It’s designed primarily for young adults with intellectual development disabilities, many of whom advocates say should have more control than traditional guardianship allows.

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