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Why New GMO Labels Might Not Tell The Whole Story

Jul 25, 2016
Joe Hren/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Fabi Calvo pays pretty close attention to what’s in her food. She’s careful when she’s at the grocery store, not just because she’s allergic to milk, but because she cares about what she’s eating in general, something many of us can relate to.

Congress recently approved legislation that requires food labels to list genetically-modified ingredients or GMOs.

You would think it’s as easy as just looking on the packaging to see what’s in the food you’re eating. For example, the number of calories can clearly be seen on a nutrition label.

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

State officials are taking the road funding debate outside the statehouse, to rural locations across the state.

The meetings between the Department of Transportation and Indiana Farm Bureau are a chance for rural residents to speak up about their infrastructure needs.

Larry Pullam was one such resident at a recent meeting in Crawfordsville. He's a retired corn and soybean farmer from Hendricks County, and says he never felt like he had a voice in the infrastructure conversation before the meeting.

Courtesy Governor Mike Pence

Indiana governor Mike Pence will be in the spotlight tonight as he delivers the keynote speech at the Republican National Convention.

In selecting Pence as his running mate, presidential candidate Donald Trump more than once has touted the corporate tax cuts implemented during Pence’s administration to attract new investment and create jobs.

Pence also has impacted health issues during his nearly four years as governor and 12 years in Congress. 

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Jake Harper looks at the governor’s record on health policy in Indiana.

Brandon Smith

Democratic gubernatorial candidate John Gregg says Governor Mike Pence’s departure from the race to run instead for vice president will not change his message or his strategy, even though he has been shifting away from talking about Pence.

Even before Gregg announced his gubernatorial run, the message out of the Democratic Party was “Fire Mike Pence.” Gregg, though, says his message as a candidate has never involved the governor.

Chris Morisse Vizza

The first week of August is the target date for the Tippecanoe County Election Board to test and choose new software to check voters in during the November election.

Problems with the program that electronically verified voters at polls during the May primary election prompted the board to end the county’s contract with Robis Elections and start searching for a new provider.

Chris Morisse Vizza

The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission says it needs an additional two months to review American Suburban Utilities’ rate hike request due to the method the utility used to formulate its proposed rates.

The Commission says the privately-owned wastewater utility near West Lafayette used a hybrid test-period to calculate rate increases phased in over three years – a methodology the Commission has not seen before.

Brandon Smith

Hundreds of America’s mayors are in Indiana this weekend for the U.S. Conference of Mayors’ annual conference.

They’re calling for Congress and the presidential candidates to support the nation’s cities.

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake leads the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

Kicking off the group’s annual meeting, she emphasized the importance of metropolitan hubs to the nation’s economy.

Peter Anderson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/dubswede/

Under a guilty plea earlier this year for misdemeanor intimidation, James Wesley Howell was supposed to forfeit all his guns. 

But Clark County probation officers only took one of them.

Two months after the guilty plea, Howell was arrested in California with three assault rifles and chemicals for making explosives.  Democratic Representative Ed DeLaney (D-Indianapolis) calls it a systemic failure at every level.

Alan Cleaver / https://www.flickr.com/photos/alancleaver/

Indiana came closer than it’s ever come during the last session to joining the ranks of states with bias crime, or hate crime laws. 

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Brandon Smith frames the debate over the legislation, including the difficult road it faces going forward.

Indiana came closer than it’s ever come during the 2016 legislative session to joining the ranks of states with bias crime, or hate crime, laws. 

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Brandon Smith frames the debate on the legislation, including the difficult road it faces going forward.

Indiana Senators Weigh In On Gun Control Debate

Jun 16, 2016
Shannon Orem / https://www.flickr.com/photos/playbeasy/

Indiana’s Democratic Senator Joe Donnelly participated in a nearly 15-hour filibuster on gun control in the wake of the Orlando nightclub shooting.

Democratic Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut started the filibuster, urging his colleagues to vote on gun control measures after 49 people died over the weekend in the country’s largest mass shooting.

Indiana’s Democratic Senator Joe Donnelly echoed some of Murphy’s sentiments, saying he’s a strong supporter of the second amendment but believes there are smart ways to reduce gun violence.

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