Government

Government News

Brandon Smith

Hundreds of America’s mayors are in Indiana this weekend for the U.S. Conference of Mayors’ annual conference.

They’re calling for Congress and the presidential candidates to support the nation’s cities.

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake leads the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

Kicking off the group’s annual meeting, she emphasized the importance of metropolitan hubs to the nation’s economy.

Peter Anderson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/dubswede/

Under a guilty plea earlier this year for misdemeanor intimidation, James Wesley Howell was supposed to forfeit all his guns. 

But Clark County probation officers only took one of them.

Two months after the guilty plea, Howell was arrested in California with three assault rifles and chemicals for making explosives.  Democratic Representative Ed DeLaney (D-Indianapolis) calls it a systemic failure at every level.

Alan Cleaver / https://www.flickr.com/photos/alancleaver/

Indiana came closer than it’s ever come during the last session to joining the ranks of states with bias crime, or hate crime laws. 

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Brandon Smith frames the debate over the legislation, including the difficult road it faces going forward.

Indiana came closer than it’s ever come during the 2016 legislative session to joining the ranks of states with bias crime, or hate crime, laws. 

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Brandon Smith frames the debate on the legislation, including the difficult road it faces going forward.

Indiana Senators Weigh In On Gun Control Debate

Jun 16, 2016
Shannon Orem / https://www.flickr.com/photos/playbeasy/

Indiana’s Democratic Senator Joe Donnelly participated in a nearly 15-hour filibuster on gun control in the wake of the Orlando nightclub shooting.

Democratic Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut started the filibuster, urging his colleagues to vote on gun control measures after 49 people died over the weekend in the country’s largest mass shooting.

Indiana’s Democratic Senator Joe Donnelly echoed some of Murphy’s sentiments, saying he’s a strong supporter of the second amendment but believes there are smart ways to reduce gun violence.

Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

Indiana’s Senate immigration study committee shifted its focus in its third meeting Wednesday to the impact of both legal and illegal immigration on the workforce. 

The committee heard testimony from a variety of sources: business organizations, immigration attorneys and people who’ve gone through the immigration process. And a common theme surfaced. 

Here’s Indianapolis immigration attorney Angela Adams:

“It’s largely up to the federal government to solve this quagmire of immigration policy.”

Mike Ripley from the Indiana Chamber of Commerce:

Michael Coghlan / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecogh/

Tippecanoe County Sheriff Barry Richard says his department needs to add 26 employees over the next five years to keep up with demand for services.

That total includes 10 additional deputies to patrol roads, 10 correctional officers to work in the jail, three dispatchers, two bailiffs and an administrative assistant for the detective division.  

Richard says the five-year plan is based on criteria such as the volume of calls for help and the number of deputies per capita.

Jim Grey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mobilene/

Abortion remains as controversial as ever, but a bill passed this year in Indiana, which bans abortions based on race, sex, and disability and prohibits the selling of fetal tissue, has garnered an especially harsh response.

Flickr.com / https://www.flickr.com/photos/75905404@N00/

The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana filed suit Thursday against Tippecanoe County on behalf of a group that advocates for the legalization of marijuana.

The lawsuit alleges the county violated the First Amendment rights of Higher Society of Indiana Inc. when the commissioners denied the group’s request to hold a June 17 rally on the courthouse grounds.  

Indiana BMV

The Indiana Ethics Commission Thursday approved a minimal fine for a former Bureau of Motor Vehicles official who violated a state ethics policy.  

Chris Morisse Vizza / WBAA News

Hoosiers changed the way property taxes are calculated, says Tippecanoe County Auditor Bob Plantenga, when voters in 2009 overwhelmingly approved a constitutional amendment setting permanent limits on all property taxes.

The total tax bill on residential property can’t exceed 1-percent of the home’s gross assessed value.

Tax bills on rental units, Ag land and long-term care facilities can’t exceed 2-percent of the value. The limit for business and industry is 3-percent.

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