Government News

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting


Bartholomew County may try the unusual tactic of a residential property tax deduction to ease tensions between large livestock farms and nearby residents.


At a property tax appeals board hearing Tuesday, county assessor Lew Wilson says not many Indiana counties have tried using the tax code to tackle the effects of concentrated animal feeding operations, or CAFOs.


"I think it’s a little bit of new territory that we’ve got to deal with," he says.


City of Frankfort

Frankfort Mayor Chris McBarnes is on track to get an $8,000 raise next year.

That constitutes a 15-percent increase – compared to the 3-percent pay raise budgeted for most other city employees, as well as the clerk-treasurer and city judge.

Clerk-Treasurer Judy Sheets says, in accordance with federal law, the parks superintendent is set to receive an 8-percent raise.

The Frankfort City Council on Tuesday approved the salary ordinance on second reading. One more vote is required at next month’s council meeting.

WFIU Public Radio

Indiana lawmakers taking a comprehensive look at the state’s alcohol laws gave industry representatives a chance to weigh in during a Tuesday study committee meeting.

The Public Policy Study Committee’s first meeting was all about the history of Indiana’s alcohol laws. At the second, for those who’ve followed alcohol debates over the years, it was more of the same.

Brandon Smith / IPBS

Democrats say Indiana Republicans are putting party over country by refusing to withdraw support for presidential candidate Donald Trump over his remarks about sexually assaulting women.

Democrats call it the GOP’s “deafening silence.”

Republican candidates for federal and statewide offices condemned Donald Trump’s remarks from a 2005 video in which he talks about kissing and inappropriately grabbing women without their consent.

Chris Morisse Vizza/WBAA

A clearer picture of the progress and the challenges for the Hoosier State passenger rail service is emerging as the books close on Amtrak’s first fiscal year of operating the route in conjunction with the state, the cities served by the line, and private contractor Iowa Pacific Holdings.

At the end of August, Amtrak reported ticket sales of $886,000 for the first 11 months of the 2016 fiscal year, a 30 percent increase over the previous year.

Noah Coffey /

State revenues are still falling short of projections, three months into the fiscal year.

Revenue numbers released Friday show Indiana earned nearly $26 million less in sales tax than it expected in September.

Those revenues have fallen short of expectations for 19 of the past 21 months.

Central Indiana Glass & Glazing

The Lafayette City Council Tuesday night passed the first reading of an ordinance that would give the mayor and other elected officials a 5.5-percent raise.

City Controller Mike Jones says Lafayette employees are all on a salary grid and the increase will bring the incomes of elected officials up to par with other personnel.

“[We’re] trying to get everybody caught up and the hope is that as things look better and better in the private sector, that we can entice the good people that we have to stay,” Jones says.

Courtesy Governor Mike Pence

The head of Exodus Refugee Immigration says Syrian refugees in Indiana are relieved and feeling positive after a federal court blocked Governor Mike Pence’s efforts to keep them out of the state.

Governor Pence, citing security concerns about Syrian refugees, sought to cut off federal funding to organizations like Exodus Refugee Immigration that resettle refugees in Indiana. A federal Appeals Court this week upheld a lower court ruling to block Pence from denying those funds.

Gretchen Frazee / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The U.S. Court of Appeals has ruled against Governor Mike Pence in a lawsuit seeking to block federal funds for resettling Syrian refugees in Indiana.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana sued the state on behalf of Exodus Refugee Immigration last November, after Pence announced the suspension of accepting Syrian refugees to the state.

Lee Coursey /

A debate over a specific way to generate transportation funding dollars resurfaced during the third meeting of the state roads task on Thursday.

The discussion focused on funding sources. And an idea promoted by a Purdue expert testifying before the panel provoked debate among its members: specifically, the value of vehicle miles traveled, or VMT, fees.

In a VMT system, people pay for how many miles they drive.

Republican Sen. Brandt Hershman, (R-Buck Creek), says he has issues with using that type of fee to pay for roads.