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Indiana tax collections surged above expectations in May as the state heads into the final month of the fiscal year.

A new revenue forecast delivered in April put a damper on Indiana’s tax revenue performance. The state was $34 million behind expectations after last month’s poor collections.

Eric Holcomb leaves Monday for his first international economic development trip as governor. He’ll spend 10 days in Hungary and France, hoping to shore up global ties for Indiana’s top-earning manufacturing and automotive industries.

Indiana is already a center of investment for countries that include Japan and Germany. But the Indiana Economic Development Corporation says the Hoosier State will be the first to create what it calls a “formal framework with Hungary” to promote business and trade development.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

A couple of towns and a city in West Central Indiana are among a majority of Indiana municipalities focusing the most recent round of Community Development Block Grant funding on water system improvements.

The Town of Oxford, in Benton County, is focusing its funding on a stormwater program to prevent flooding in residential areas.

The state granted $500,000 each to Oxford and the Cass County town of Royal Center, as well as $550,000 to Attica.

Indiana convenience stores want Hoosiers to hear directly from them on the need for changes to the state’s alcohol laws.

They’re launching an advocacy campaign that comes as lawmakers prepare to study alcohol laws this summer.

Joe Hren / IPBS

A 75 degree, partly sunny day with a car window cracked open could still cause a pet locked inside to suffer heat stroke.

That’s why a state law that takes effect July 1st allows a passerby to break into a hot car to rescue the pet and not be charged with a crime. The law does say the person breaking the window still has to pay for half the cost of vehicle repairs.

Monroe County Humane Association Executive Director Rebecca Warren says she thinks the new law is a good step forward.

State Supreme Court Considers DCS Caseload Lawsuit

Jun 1, 2017

The Indiana Supreme Court heard arguments Thursday over whether a Department of Child Services caseworker’s lawsuit against the agency will move forward.

Only one of Indiana’s 19 DCS regions meets mandatory caseload limits at this time.

State law says DCS must provide enough caseworkers so that the average caseload in each region doesn’t exceed 12 active cases or 17 children supervised.

Advocates pushing legislation to shrink Indiana’s food deserts will have another chance this summer to convince lawmakers of the bill’s merits.

But the pending closure of two Indiana-based grocery store chains and debates among Indiana Republicans mean the problem doesn’t have an easy solution.

A food desert – as defined in recent legislation – is any area of the state where at least a quarter of residents are below the poverty line and at least a third live a significant distance from any grocery store.

Change could be coming for Indiana’s alcohol laws after legislative leaders announced a two-year study of the state’s alcohol statutes. And legislators say the special commission won’t involve the alcohol industry.

Controversy this past session over convenience stores obtaining alcohol carryout permits – otherwise expressly prohibited in state law – prompted the creation of the alcohol law study commission.

On Wednesday, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office released an updated report outlining potential effects of the updated GOP health care bill – the American Health Care Act. The findings indicate that over the next 10 years, 23 million Americans would lose insurance under the AHCA.

That’s one million fewer than the projection for the first version of the AHCA, which failed in the U.S House in March.

Gov. Eric Holcomb signed a bill Thursday providing aid for a lead contaminated neighborhood in East Chicago, Indiana.

House Bill 1344 expands lead testing in the soil and water of the USS Lead Superfund site in East Chicago. At the bill signing in East Chicago, Holcomb says nothing could be more important than getting the city back on track.

“From the street to your Statehouse to the White House, we are going to make sure East Chicago stays on track,” says Holcomb.

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