General News

A judge’s ruling halting parts of the state’s new anti-abortion law is, in the words of retiring Indiana Planned Parenthood CEO Betty Cockrum, a “fine last hurrah” for her.

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Esther Honig / Side Effects/WOSU

Charlie Stewart is tall, 25 years old, and broad-shouldered. He’s wearing a gray polo shirt and slacks, and starts each morning with a protein shake.

Every Tuesday you can find him walking the narrow linoleum halls of the emergency department at Mount Carmel West in Columbus, Ohio.

The federal government continues to oppose intervention by a group of East Chicago, Indiana, residents, who are asking a U.S. District Court to give them a larger role in the clean up of their lead and arsenic contaminated neighborhood.

The East Chicago residents were first turned down in May by Magistrate Judge Paul Cherry.

He ruled, “This case was closed over two years ago. To allow [the residents] to intervene now…would be highly prejudicial to the parties, who have already negotiated, settled, and obtained judgement in this case.”

Indiana health insurers will file their 2018 rates this week for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace but uncertainty about the future of health care reform may play into price and availability for the roughly 150,000 Hoosiers in the system.

Beverly Knight is self-employed. She was able to have a double knee-surgery because she is covered under the ACA.  She’s worried about rate hikes.

“If President Trump’s plan to sabotage the ACA succeeds, and premiums skyrocket as many expect, hundreds of Hoosier families, including mine, will be devastated,” Knight says.

Indianapolis philanthropist and school reform advocate Al Hubbard has taken himself out of consideration for the nomination for U.S. Education Department deputy secretary.

Hubbard told WFYI News he’s been undergoing the vetting process for the country’s No. 2 education job for months but the requirements of the Office of Government Ethics would have caused financial complications for his family.

A Fort Wayne-based disability advocacy group created a website that will help people with disabilities find services throughout Indiana.

During her research on youth behavioral health, University of Indianapolis assistant professor Katherine Kivisto was struck by a connection she was seeing.

“What I was seeing was kids that had a really hard time with self-regulating their emotions and tolerating especially distressing feelings they would turn to substances as a way of coping,” Kivisto says.

The University of Indianapolis’s first study to be funded by the National Institute of Health will work to understand how emotion regulation is connected to teen addiction.

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Muhraz / Wikimedia Commons

Indiana has announced that it hopes to add a work requirement to its Medicaid program. The changes would increase the program’s overall cost by tens of millions of dollars per year, according to the state’s proposal, and could add new hurdles to maintaining coverage for low-income residents.

Indiana Wants to Add A Work Requirement To HIP 2.0

May 24, 2017

In a week when federal health policy is dominating the headlines, Indiana is also looking to make some unusual changes to its Medicaid program.

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Courtesy/Lutheran Health Network

Lutheran Health Network is currently owned by Tennessee-based Community Health Systems, but a group of Northeast Indiana doctors wants to buy it from the multi-state health organization.

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