General News

Wildlife in Need

The animal rights advocacy organization People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals is threatening to sue a southern Indiana wildlife center.

PETA says it will sue Wildlife in Need, located near Louisville in Charlestown, Indiana, and its owner Timothy Stark unless the organization agrees to move its big cats to other sanctuaries.

J J / flickr.com/photos/tattoodjay/4172577749

The Lafayette Police Department is asking residents to bring unwanted drugs and needles to them, instead of flushing them down the toilet or giving them away.

The LPD is hosting a ‘drug takeback’ event this weekend in an effort to keep substances like unused opioids off the streets and out of the water – but it’s not primarily addressed at the types of drugs Lafayette is having the most trouble policing, such as heroin.

Sgt. Matt Gard says even if a person brings illicit drugs or a prescription that isn’t theirs, they should feel safe to let the police dispose of it.

Tippecanoe County Area Plan Commission

A Lafayette subdivision comprised of Habitat for Humanity homes is one step closer to breaking ground on the city’s southwest side.

The Tippecanoe County Area Plan Commission approved a plan for up to seven additional homes at its last meeting – despite a few nearby residents speaking out against it. 

In 2004, utilities were routed to the area to accommodate houses. Assistant City Engineer Bob Foley says that was in preparation for redevelopment.

The choice of former state Sen. Beverly Gard to lead a commission on overhauling Indiana’s alcohol code is drawing praise from at least one side of a heated debate: the gas station and convenience store lobby.

The two-year study committee is tasked with finding ways to modernize Indiana’s complex rules for the sale of beer, wine and liquor. Legislative leaders want the panel to be free of any ties to the alcohol industry.

Gov. Eric Holcomb’s infrastructure plan dedicates some money to the completion of I-69, but it doesn’t specifically address the ongoing issues with construction of Section 5 from Bloomington to Martinsville.

The governor unveiled a list of infrastructure projects across the state Thursday that will get funding over the next five years.

courtesy Duke Energy

The line of strong storms that swept across much of Indiana Tuesday left in its wake more than 16,000 power outages, according to Duke Energy.

But Duke spokesman Lew Middleton says it wasn’t the number of customers left without power that was taxing power line crews.

“The unusual thing is that the outages are spread out as geographically as they are," Middleton says. "We’ve certainly had greater numbers of outages, but usually those are concentrated in a smaller geography.”

Wabash & Erie Canal Park / Facebook

Four months after two girls were murdered walking along one of Delphi’s trails, there’s a push to make the area safer.

The Wabash and Erie Canal Association wants to add trail markers, information kiosks, and more lighting to the 10-mile system.

Association President Dan McCain says cameras would also be installed at the start of the trails.

Indiana American Water has a warning for Hoosiers this Fourth of July as they set off – and clean up – their pyrotechnic displays.

Fireworks contain a chemical called perchlorate. It’s also found in rocket fuels, explosives, and some fertilizer. At high levels, the chemical in drinking water can create problems with the human thyroid gland, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

Indiana American Water serves a million Hoosiers. Company spokesman Joe Loughmiller says there’s a few ways Hoosiers can lessen the threat fireworks pose to the state’s water sources.

St. Thomas Aquinas / Facebook

A prominent atheist group warns Purdue University could be setting a dangerous precedent with its proposed Catholic residence hall.

Patrick Elliott is an attorney with the Madison, Wisconsin-based Freedom from Religion Foundation. He says Purdue can’t favor one religion over others.

State Approves Three Fantasy Sports Companies Under New Regulations

Jun 29, 2017

Under new regulations, paid fantasy sports companies have to pay a $50,000 initial licensing fee, and a $5,000 annual fee after that. (Photo by Drew Daudelin)

The Indiana Gaming Commission Thursday granted licenses to three paid fantasy sports companies. That comes after state lawmakers approved new regulations on paid fantasy sports this year, including a $50,000 licensing fee.

The approved companies represent only a small percentage of websites offering the service.

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