General News

Three Die In Heroin-Suspected Overdoses In Vigo County

Apr 20, 2017
J J / flickr.com/photos/tattoodjay/4172577749

Police suspect three Vigo County deaths could be the result of laced heroin. Authorities now say officers need to carry more of the overdose intervention drug naloxone.

Police say four people in Vigo County overdosed just this week and three of the overdoses were fatal. Officers started carrying one dose of naloxone in February of this year. Now some are carrying up to three doses. 

Sgt. Stephen Lockard with the Vigo County Drug Task Force says even that may not be enough. 

GOP Leaders Unveil Final Road Funding Package Details

Apr 20, 2017

 

Republican legislative leaders unveiled what Speaker Brian Bosma calls the “best infrastructure program” in state history.

GOP leaders say the funding package they’ve put together will eventually generate about $1.2 billion a year for state and local roads. Senate President Pro Tem David Long (R-Fort Wayne) says that plan will last the next two decades.

“We’re not kicking the can down the road like they do in Washington,” Long says.

March For Science Lafayette

The focus of today's WBAA Wake-Up Call is on the increasing number of rallies and demonstrations organized by local people who want to shine a light on a particular issue.

The question is, do these public events simply provide a short-term forum, or do the gatherings inspire individuals to transform their behaviors, take action, and work for change in government and social policy?

Amy Austin, of West Lafayette, is spearheading the March for Science from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday at Riehle Plaza in downtown Lafayette. 

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

A children’s gym recently opened in Lafayette is one of few in the state to offer equipment tailored for children on the autism spectrum. 

 “Yeah, I like the arts and crafts, and this part – there’s a lot of stuff I like,” says Trenton Coleman, 7, about his favorite things at the new Lafayette gym.

  

A bill headed to Gov. Eric Holcomb’s desk would allow governments to charge the public up to $20 an hour for public records searches.

If a public records request takes more than two hours to complete, Rep. Kathy Richardson’s (R-Noblesville) bill says the government agency can charge up to $20 an hour for the work.

Former governor Mike Pence vetoed such a bill two years ago.

The Senate made a change to the measure, exempting title records search companies from having to pay the fee.

Local officials say their piece of the road funding pie needs to be a lot bigger after a significant decrease in the Senate plan. The Senate proposal cut local funding by more than two-thirds from the House version.

And while local officials obviously aren’t happy with the funding decrease in the Senate roads bill, there are other provisions they’d also like to see changed.

House Approves Vaping Regulations Bill

Apr 6, 2017

The House overwhelmingly approved a bill to regulate Indiana’s vaping industry, aiming to undo a monopoly created by existing law.

Indiana’s existing e-liquid law forced dozens of manufacturers to either leave the state or shut down, leaving only seven sanctioned companies.

A federal court ruling earlier this year struck down the bulk of existing regulations.

 

Legislation allowing police to collect DNA samples from anyone they arrest for a felony took a step closer to becoming law.

Backers of the legislation say DNA collection will help identify the guilty and exonerate the innocent.

Under the bill, if a person is arrested but not charged within one year, the DNA record can be expunged. The same is true if charges are dismissed or the person is acquitted.

 

The controversy over Ricker’s convenience stores’ ability to sell cold beer and hard alcohol grew more contentious as the House killed a bill that would’ve let Ricker’s keep its permits.

At issue are restaurant permits Ricker’s was able to secure at two of its convenience stores. Those permits allow them to sell cold beer and hard liquor for carryout – previously, the sole right of liquor stores and restaurants.

The vast majority of House lawmakers approved a bill to legalize baby boxes in hospitals – over the objections of the Department of Child Services.

The measure now also sanctions the state’s two existing boxes.

Baby boxes are intended to provide mothers with more anonymity when dropping off newborns. Current law gives people immunity from child abandonment charges only if the baby is delivered to another person.

Rep. Martin Carbaugh (R-Fort Wayne) says the reality is that some mothers aren’t willing to face another person when dropping off their newborn.

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