General News

Erika Fierro immigrated to the U.S. when she was 5-years-old and has two U.S.-born children. Last month, despite no criminal history, she was arrested by immigration officials outside her home.

Religious leaders in Indiana accompanied Fierro to her mandatory immigration check-in Tuesday and held a vigil to protest her situation.

Her pastor and the Catholic Archbishop of Indianapolis Charles Thompson attended her immigration check-in for both support and out of concern that Fierro would be immediately detained.

Policy Changes Coming To Foster Care System

Apr 24, 2018
Legislation authored by Sen. Andy Zay (R-Huntington) will increase the maximum number of children allowed in a foster home from five to six. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

The rate of Indiana children in foster care is more than double the national average. It’s one of the issues identified by an independent investigation of the state’s embattled child welfare agency.

Advocates hope upcoming policy changes will aid the foster care system.

 

If you’ve ever tried to make a call at a busy sporting event, you know how jammed up the cell phone network can get. Now, imagine having that problem if you’re a first responder, trying to get in contact during an emergency.

A nationwide cellular network aims to solve that problem.

One tragic event in particular led responders to realize they needed better communication tools.

Responders lacked communication during 9/11 events

The National Constitutional Coalition of Patriotic Americans, a newly-formed grassroots organization, hosted pro-gun rallies simultaneously at every state capitol Saturday. 

Pro-gun protesters weren’t allowed onto statehouse property. The gun-friendly statehouse is a gun-free zone with the exception of lawmakers and staff. Protesters instead crowded on a wide sidewalk in front of the steps, listening to lawmakers and advocates.

Barbara Brosher / WFIU/WTIU News

 

The rain didn’t stop people from coming out to the first Pride Festival in Vice President Mike Pence’s hometown of Columbus Saturday.

The city closed off several blocks of 4th Street for the event, which featured information booths, Pride merchandise and live entertainment.

Lawmakers Fix Loopholes In Impaired Driving Law

Apr 13, 2018
Prosecutors say a recent change to Indiana law should fix the state’s impaired driving statute. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Prosecutors say a recent change to Indiana law should fix loopholes in the state’s impaired driving statute.

The Environmental Protection Agency visited East Chicago, Indiana, Saturday, to update residents on contamination cleanup.

EPA Region 5 Administrator Cathy Stepp and U.S. EPA senior advisor Albert Kelly attended the briefing and listened to public comment.

Residents heard updates from the on-site remediation coordinators and participated in, sometimes heated, Q&A sessions. Those comments were heard loud and clear, says Kelly.

A U.S. Department of Commerce document lists Purdue University research as a source for recommending a 24 percent tariff on imported steel.

When Purdue agricultural economics professor Thomas Hertel first saw the Trump Administration’s math, he had to check for himself.

“We quickly re-ran that experiment here and we get the same outcome,” says Hertel.

He created the Global Trade Analysis Project Model, referred to as GTAP, 25 years ago. The free database runs analyses on the impacts of tariffs and today has more than 17,000 users in 170 countries.

Inmates at the Indiana Women’s Prison will soon be the first outside of California to enroll in a computer coding seminar. The Last Mile program tries to reduce recidivism and train women for a career path where they’re under-represented.

“We all need a second chance,” says MC Hammer, the musician known for "U Can't Touch This" and a board member of The Last Mile. “This is a country of second chances and these ladies deserve a second chance.”

China’s newest list of proposed tariffs include one of Indiana's staple crops – soybeans – and would hit the Hoosier agriculture industry hard.

Purdue professor of agricultural economics Wally Tyner and colleague Farzard Taheripour studied the possible impact the tariff like the one announced would have on the U.S. Tyner says the 25 percent proposed tariff on soybeans would hurt the U.S. economy.

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