General News

Justice Rucker To Leave Supreme Court

Jan 19, 2017

 

Indiana Supreme Court Justice Robert Rucker says he looks forward to spending more time with family as he prepares to step down from the court.

Rucker says he almost retired in 2012, when he turned 65 and was up for a retention vote.

The Gary native and 26-year veteran of the bench is the only current justice appointed by a Democratic governor. But he says he doesn’t expect the court to become more conservative because, in Indiana, a partially independent panel chooses the three nominees for the gubernatorial appointment.

Indiana’s new governor, Eric Holcomb, vowed to tackle the state’s drug addiction epidemic in his first State of the State address on Tuesday. But he has also said he supports Congress’s plans to repeal and replace Obamacare.

A federal judge says a farm labor recruiter must pay $56,631 in back wages to a group of visa workers who came from Mexico to Indiana in 2014.

The 26 Mexican workers got H-2A visas through Tejas Workforce Connection of Texas, which recruits temporary agricultural workers for companies including Beck’s Hybrids in Hamilton County.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jstephenconn/3051019997
J. Stephen Conn

The newly-reformed Crawfordsville Commission on Human Rights is looking to tackle what the city says is a growing number of issues concerning diversity in the Montgomery County community.

The 12-person commission is intended to serve as an advising body to the mayor and city council on affairs concerning diversity and human rights in the community. The commission was officially created in 1979 but involvement had lapsed in recent years.

Balanced Budget Amendment Clears Senate Committee

Jan 17, 2017

 

A Senate committee approved language that would amend Indiana’s constitution to require the General Assembly to pass a balanced budget.

Former Gov. Mike Pence first pushed the balanced budget amendment in 2015.

It easily passed the General Assembly that year. If it passes again, this session or next, it will go to voters for their approval in the 2018 general election.

There are too few geriatricians to treat senior Hoosiers, and national projections indicate, by 2030, there will be only one geriatric psychiatrist for every 27,000. With more responsibility falling to providers untrained in senior mental health, an Indiana University scientist has co-authored a guide.

Dr. Sophia Wang is a geriatric psychiatrist and scientist with the Indiana University Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science. She says caregivers need to know the mental health risks for older adults.

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) will introduce a bill in Congress later this month to punish companies for outsourcing American jobs, using federal contracts and tax breaks as leverage.

At a press conference in Indianapolis Friday, Donnelly spoke alongside workers from companies moving production from Indiana to Mexico, including Rexnord and Carrier.

Lita Freeman is one of 700 employees who will be laid off at Carrier’s factory in Huntington.

Lawmakers Propose Aid For East Chicago Lead Crisis

Jan 13, 2017

 

Northwest Indiana legislators have introduced four pieces of legislation to provide state aid for the lead contamination crisis in East Chicago, Indiana.

Rep. Earl Harris, Jr. says his bill’s first priority is resident safety.

“So it really works on how we help out the area in terms of excavation, removing contaminated soil, restoration, and also relocating residents in the area,” Harris says.

Legislation Filed To Repeal ISTEP With Yet-To-Be Decided Replacement Test

Jan 12, 2017

Proposed legislation from the Indiana House’s top education lawmaker would end the state’s controversial ISTEP+ exam in 2018 and pave the way for a yet-to-be determined replacement.

This may sound familiar.

Last year, lawmakers voted to eliminate the assessment following outcry from teachers, parents and lawmakers over the length, makeup and roll out of the test.

The hope was a new exam could be in place soon. But lawmakers said this month it could take two years to create it.

Tony Webster / https://www.flickr.com/photos/diversey/

The Tippecanoe County Coroner’s office says foul play is not suspected in the death of a Purdue University student.

The coroner’s office early Thursday afternoon released that information after completing an autopsy on the man.

The office says it will not identify the man at this time

Previously reported:

Purdue University Police and the Tippecanoe County Coroner’s office are investigating the death of a male student.

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