General News

First Safe Haven Baby Drop-off Boxes Installed In Indiana

Apr 27, 2016
Safe Haven Baby Boxes / safehavenbabyboxes.com

The first baby boxes in the country are being unveiled at two northern Indiana fire stations this week. The boxes act as incubators to protect babies abandoned under the state’s Safe Haven law, passed in 2015.

Indiana law allows parents of unwanted newborns to give up their babies at fire stations, police departments and hospitals. The Safe Haven Baby Boxes aim to keep those parents anonymous and their baby safe.

Irene Grassi / https://www.flickr.com/photos/sun_sand_sea

The USDA is offering up nearly $12 million in funding to increase internet access in rural communities.

The annual federal grant program has funded one major Indiana broadband project in the past -- an $800,000 community computer center for Harrison County, near Kentucky.

Phil Lehmkuhler is the USDA's rural director in Indiana. He says it's hard to do business these days without the web -- more goods and services go online every year, putting disconnected towns at an increasing disadvantage.

Senators To Government Publishing Office: It's 'Hoosiers'

Apr 12, 2016
Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

Indiana’s U.S. Senators have sent a bipartisan letter to the federal office responsible for printing government documents, asking that the word “Hoosiers” be the official word to describe Indiana natives.

According to a style manual from the U.S. Government Publishing Office, those who live in Indiana are “Indianans.”  That office produces and prints documents for all three branches of the federal government.

Senators Dan Coats (R-IN) and Joe Donnelly (D-IN) sent a letter Tuesday, urging the use of “Hoosiers” instead. 

Carissa Rogers / https://www.flickr.com/photos/goodncrazy/5531939741

A federal court says an Indiana law banning robocalls can bar political calls without violating the First Amendment. 

Indiana law bars anyone from making autodialed phone calls with just three exceptions – schools sending messages to parents, students and employees, employers calling workers about their schedule, or callers that have an existing relationship with a subscriber. 

kov-A-c / https://www.flickr.com/photos/yovac/14427821648

Freezing temperatures this week are concerning Purdue University agricultural specialists.

Peaches, grapes and wheat are especially vulnerable right now. Greg Bossaer, assistant program leader for agriculture and natural resources at Purdue Extension, says it’s possible that prolonged freezing temperatures could decrease the supply or increase the price of affected crops.

“The jury’s still out here, and it’s probably going to depend on these next few evenings,” he says.

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