gambling

David Clow / https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidclow/3876732726

Senate lawmakers have taken steps to regulate daily fantasy sports but chosen chose not to classify the practice as gambling.

A Senate bill passed easily, but the legislation’s path through the House isn’t as secure.

The Senate legislation imposed some regulation on the multi-million dollar industry, including bans on insider information and prohibiting professional athletes and officials from playing. 

Harrison Wagner / Indiana Public Broadcasting

A Senate panel Wednesday unanimously approved legislation legalizing and regulating daily fantasy sports, such as the websites Fan Duel and DraftKings. 

The proposed bill would impose some insider information protections, barring daily fantasy employees and their families from playing. 

It also bars professional athletes and officials from playing. 

The measure says game operators must ensure their players are at least 18 years of age and must charge an entry fee to play. 

Cavalier92 / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cavalier92/2824647761

Fantasy football is alive and well in Indiana, but legislators may seek legal protections for players.

New York's attorney general has asked a judge to declare fantasy league sites like Draft Kings and Fan Duel illegal gambling.

Rep. Alan Morrison (R-Terre Haute) says he's not looking to ban the leagues -- he says they're games of skill.

“It’s not been viewed as gambling, I think, throughout the country up to this point and I think that it’s fair to look at it as a game of skill and that’s how we’re going to move forward with it,” Morrison says.

Harrison Wagner / Indiana Public Broadcasting

If you’ve watched any sports lately, or listened to any music online, you’ve likely heard ads for fantasy sports websites Draft Kings and Fan Duel.

There’s a debate raging over whether the sites, which allow wagering on each day’s games for several sports leagues, are legal.

The New York Attorney General’s offices has banned the companies from accepting bets in that state because he argues the activity constitutes illegal gambling.

 The state of Illinois recently released a statement saying any large lottery payouts would be delayed because of the state’s ongoing financial issues -- Good news for the Hoosier Lottery and their retailers.

Back in July, Illinois capped lottery payouts at 25,000.

But with a budget impasse ongoing in the Illinois statehouse, the state’s lottery officials have now lowered that number to $600.

This has Illinois lottery players looking elsewhere, and Hoosier Lottery retailers have been happy to help.

Tom Dermody / http://www.indianahouserepublicans.com/members/leadership/tom-dermody

The chairman of one of the most powerful committees at the statehouse won't run for a sixth term next year.

House Public Policy Chairman Tom Dermody (R-LaPorte) says Republicans have talked to him about other offices, and doesn't rule it out in the future. But he says it's time to step aside for now after 10 years, especially since his son will be a senior in high school next year.

Daniel Incandela / https://www.flickr.com/photos/incandopolis/3789053490/

A proposal to move 700 gaming positions from Rising Sun to a new casino in Indianapolis may have more support in Rising Sun than in Indy.

Rising Sun Casino owner Full House Resorts has proposed a casino on the land which was home to the old Indianapolis International Airport.

Rising Sun Mayor April Hautman says the positions Full House Resorts wants to reallocate to Indy aren't being used anyway – the existing facility is allowed to employ up to 1,400 people, but only has space for half that many.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Governor Mike Pence says he’s opposed to expansion of gaming in Indiana but won’t tell the public how he defines expansion.

This year's gaming bill allows riverboats to move inland on existing property, gives casinos a tax credit for new construction, and allows racetrack casinos to switch out some of their electronic games with tables that have live dealers. 

Though a House committee included extensive tax changes to the bill, those changes were taken out before the measure left the House this week -- and that’s something Governor Pence takes credit for.

Lisa Brewster / https://www.flickr.com/photos/sophistechate/2670946312

Legislation aimed at helping Indiana’s struggling gaming industry easily cleared the House Wednesday.  But its path to final approval may be more difficult.

The gaming bill would allow riverboats to move on land, give casinos a ten percent tax credit for new construction, and allow racetrack casinos to replace some of their electronic table games with table games that have live dealers. 

The bill’s outcome became less certain this week when Governor Mike Pence objected to the live dealers as an unwanted expansion of gaming. 

John Wardell / https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnwardell/80125882

Legislation aimed at helping Indiana’s gaming industry stem a sharp decline in revenues passed its first test in the General Assembly when a House committee approved the bill Thursday.

Rep. Tom Dermody’s (R-LaPorte) bill allows Indiana’s riverboats to move inland onto their existing footprint.  And the state’s two racetrack casinos can add table games with live dealers. 

The live table games are capped at half of the number of existing electronic table games.  And for every live table game the racinos add, they must eliminate one of the electronic ones. 

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