energy

53e1da9a-61bd-4aea-9d24-899f204affaf
Greg Wagoner / https://www.flickr.com/photos/minidriver/8090289596

IUPUI’s engineering department is adding an additional focus on the future of energy.

Purdue’s trustees voted last week to rename it the Department of Mechanical and Energy Engineering.

Dean David Russomanno says he wants to stay away from the politically-charged topic of the nation’s energy future, which he says he’s doing by encouraging IUPUI professors to be, in his words, “agnostic” about their research.

courtesy Purdue University

Purdue is set to receive almost $20 million from the National Science Foundation to run a research center studying what its leaders are calling “bridge fuels” – in other words, fuel made from gas that's trapped in underground rock. It's extracted through hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. The researchers say it’ll be needed to satisfy the country’s demand for oil until renewable resources like wind and solar become dominant in the future.

But there was no mention of the “f-word” – fracking -- during a public celebration of the grant or in any of the promotional materials concerning it.

Vectren Making The Switch To Automated Meter Reading

Aug 21, 2015
gas meters
Damian Gadal / https://www.flickr.com/photos/23024164@N06/4734008149/

The sight of a meter reader making the rounds in Tippecanoe County will soon be a thing of the past—at least for customers of natural gas company Vectren.

The firm is in the process of automating its meter-reading process, but Vectren spokeswoman Natalie Hedde says no current employees will lose their job as a result of the automation.

“The transition is not about the reduction of meter readers themselves,” she says. "It’s more about the efficiency and the accuracy of the information that we’re collecting.”

The Purdue Institute for Civic Communication (PICC) is hosting its first forum Friday, September 13. The focus is on energy and includes a debate on the topic of clean energy versus fossil fuels.

The event is free and open to the public, beginning at 1:30 p.m. in Stewart Center's Loeb Hall. It will be live streamed at HERE.

When Congress gave the White House a tight 60-day deadline for approving or rejecting the controversial Keystone project, it seemed like a Christmas gift to TransCanada, the company building the pipeline that would carry oil from Canada all the way to the Gulf of Mexico.

But TransCanada says it didn't ask for this deadline and it doesn't know how to handle this unwanted gift.

"We're heading into uncharted territory," says James Millar, a TransCanada spokesman.