Eli Lilly

Eli Lilly CEO Dave Ricks announces new diabetes pilot project. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Jill Sheridan

A new partnership aims to reduce diabetes in three neighborhoods in Indianapolis where the rates of the disease are as high as 17 percent. The effort builds on work Eli Lilly and Company has developed in Mexico, South Africa and India.

Eli Lilly and Company CEO Dave Ricks says the $7 million, five-year effort will focus on three communities in Indianapolis. 

Partnership Offers Rides To Alzheimer's Trials

Apr 10, 2018

Alzheimer's scientists say they can't find a cure if they can't do the research, and they can't do the research if they don't have volunteers.

One of the biggest challenges for clinical trial participants is transportation. A new partnership aims to provide rides for volunteers in a new Eli Lilly study in Indianapolis and other locations across the country.  

Lilly Migraine Drug One Step Closer To Market

Dec 11, 2017

A new pain medication, part of Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly’s non-opioid pain management platform, took another step forward.

The drug is called galcanezumab. It’s one of three being crafted by Eli Lilly to treat chronic and serious pain. The medicine has shown promising results in a series of trials says Dr. Robert Conley, Lilly global development leader for migraine.

“Around 60 percent of our patients lost more than half of their headache days and some patients even got to 100 percent loss of headache,” says Conley

Azar Nominated For HHS Secretary

Nov 13, 2017

President Donald Trump announced the nomination of a former Eli Lilly executive as Health and Human Services Secretary Monday. Alex Azar is the latest Hoosier headed to Washington for a post in the federal health sector.

At Indianapolis-based pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly, 2,300 employees will take buyouts as part of the company’s effort to save money by cutting at least 2,000 jobs in the U.S. by the end of the year.

It’s unclear whether layoffs are still in the works in the Hoosier state.

Lilly said in September it would aim to save $500 million by cutting 3,500 jobs out of its more than 41,000 worldwide, with at least 2,000 cut in the U.S.

Another Hoosier Health Leader Could Be Headed To D.C.

Oct 18, 2017

There are reports a former Eli Lilly leader tops the list of names President Donald Trump is considering to fill the position of Health and Human Services Secretary. Alex Azar would replace Tom Price, who left the job last month after a private plane scandal.

Azar would the take over the country’s highest health position if chosen, following a string of others leaving Indiana for the U.S. government’s health sector.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

A recent study shows Republicans -- the group that elected Purdue University President Mitch Daniels to two terms as governor -- have a souring view of whether higher education is worth it anymore.

So on this edition of WBAA's Monthly Conversation With Mitch Daniels, we ask him why conservatives might see college as less of a good influence, even as Democrats see it as more and more worthwhile.

The Indiana University School of Medicine is getting $25 million from the Lilly Endowment to recruit new scientists to Indiana, and to pair them up directly with big Indiana companies.

Medical school research dean Anantha Shekhar says it aims to fast-track the creation of treatments from discoveries about cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and more.

He says new technologies like gene sequencing are facilitating those applications faster than ever.

Eli Lilly is partnering with Pfizer to help develop a new drug that could be the first of a new class of non-opioid pain medications.

There hasn’t been a new pain medication discovery in about 50 years. The last new non-opioid pain medication to hit the market was ibuprofen in the late 1960s.

That’s a problem, because Indiana University Health’s Daniel Rusyniak says when it comes to the treatment of chronic pain we need more options.

Eli Lilly / https://www.lilly.com/newsroom

Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly has been dealt another blow by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which failed to approve a newly-developed treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

In what is referred to as a “complete response letter,” The FDA stated it wants Lilly to supply more data to clarify safes dosage levels and put certain safety concerns to rest.

Pages