Eli Lilly

Another Hoosier Health Leader Could Be Headed To D.C.

Oct 18, 2017

There are reports a former Eli Lilly leader tops the list of names President Donald Trump is considering to fill the position of Health and Human Services Secretary. Alex Azar would replace Tom Price, who left the job last month after a private plane scandal.

Azar would the take over the country’s highest health position if chosen, following a string of others leaving Indiana for the U.S. government’s health sector.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

A recent study shows Republicans -- the group that elected Purdue University President Mitch Daniels to two terms as governor -- have a souring view of whether higher education is worth it anymore.

So on this edition of WBAA's Monthly Conversation With Mitch Daniels, we ask him why conservatives might see college as less of a good influence, even as Democrats see it as more and more worthwhile.

The Indiana University School of Medicine is getting $25 million from the Lilly Endowment to recruit new scientists to Indiana, and to pair them up directly with big Indiana companies.

Medical school research dean Anantha Shekhar says it aims to fast-track the creation of treatments from discoveries about cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and more.

He says new technologies like gene sequencing are facilitating those applications faster than ever.

Eli Lilly is partnering with Pfizer to help develop a new drug that could be the first of a new class of non-opioid pain medications.

There hasn’t been a new pain medication discovery in about 50 years. The last new non-opioid pain medication to hit the market was ibuprofen in the late 1960s.

That’s a problem, because Indiana University Health’s Daniel Rusyniak says when it comes to the treatment of chronic pain we need more options.

Eli Lilly / https://www.lilly.com/newsroom

Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly has been dealt another blow by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which failed to approve a newly-developed treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

In what is referred to as a “complete response letter,” The FDA stated it wants Lilly to supply more data to clarify safes dosage levels and put certain safety concerns to rest.

Raymond Gilford / https://www.flickr.com/photos/shuttercat7/

Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly, along with two other European pharmaceutical companies, is facing a price-fixing lawsuit regarding its rapidly escalating insulin prices. Lilly makes a form of insulin called Humalog, whose list price has doubled since 2011, the lawsuit claims.

In a complaint filed in federal court Monday, the plaintiffs argue the price increase isn’t due to increased production costs but rather the exploitation of a complex system of pricing deals between insurers, manufacturers and middlemen known as pharmacy benefit managers, or PBMs.

Sarah Fentem / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Carolyn Kelso and her husband Robert live in a big house north of Indianapolis, with original paintings on the wall and furry throws on the furniture. Carolyn herself is 71, with short blonde hair and stylish chunky black glasses. 

She and her husband take their health seriously, and her mother suffered from Alzheimer’s, so she noticed right away when something was wrong.

“I’d get to the car and go down to the corner, and couldn’t remember where I was going, couldn’t remember if I was going left or right,” Carolyn Kelso says.

milosz1 / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikolski/

Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly is doubling down on its anti-Alzheimer’s disease efforts. Even though a high-profile Alzheimer’s drug failed its most recent trial, the pharma giant is still holding out hope the science behind the therapy can work.

Solanezumab would have been a Prozac-style blockbuster for Lilly. Instead, a late-stage clinical trial found it didn’t work the way scientists hoped.

Paul Sableman / https://www.flickr.com/photos/pasa/

After a promising Alzheimer’s drug failed a late-stage clinical trial, pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly has announced it will be laying off workers around the country.

The news of layoffs follows last month’s announcement concerning the failure of Solanezumab, which Lilly hoped would be the first drug to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Neil Conway / https://www.flickr.com/photos/neilconway/

Eli Lilly has announced a promising drug that would have become the first disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer’s disease has failed a late-stage clinical trial.

The results come as a devastating blow for Indianapolis-based Lilly, which had sunk decades of research and hundreds of thousands of dollars into the medication, called solanezumab, or “sola.”

The pharmaceutical world had held its breath awaiting the results of the final-stage study, which were expected to be released in early December.

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