Elections & Politics

In Indiana’s final U.S. Senate debate the candidates repeated their attacks on each other, while shifting their focus to issues of foreign policy and social security. 

Squaring off in Tuesday’s debate were Democrat Joe Donnelly and Republican Richard Mourdock, locked in a tight race with the balance of power in the U.S. Senate potentially in play. Libertarian Andrew Horning joined them to discuss foreign policy, Social Security and Medicare, and term limits for Congress. 

Republican Chuck Hockema grew up in Lafayette. He went through the Tippecanoe School Corporation and graduated from Purdue and then Brigham Young University Law School.

He says he has two major strengths that will serve him well as a state representative. The first is a background in business.

“We need substantive bills that are going to create that climate that everyone talks about for job growth," he says. "I have created jobs. I have created businesses here in Lafayette and West Lafayette. That’s definitely an area that’s going to be a big plus.”

Chris Sigurdson / WBAA Radio

The candidates in the 4th Congressional District tried to distinguish themselves during the only broadcast forum of the campaign.

Republican incumbent Todd Rokita, Democrat Tara Nelson, and Libertarian Benjamin Gehlhausen answered question about keeping college affordable, trade with China and reducing the deficit among other topics.

Two former city council members – one from Lafayette and the other from West Lafayette – are vying to represent the area which includes the two cities and the central portion of Tippecanoe County.

On November 6th voters in House District 26 have a choice of whether the area is heading in the right direction under Republican Randy Truitt or if its needs to change course with Democrat Rick Cornstuble.

WBAA’s Sam Klemet reports.

None of three men running for governor gave any new policy details in their second debate Wednesday night.

As in the first debate, Democrat John Gregg often referenced his bipartisan record as Speaker of the Indiana House. Libertarian Rupert Boneham stuck to his theme of promoting himself as not being a career politician, but a businessman trying to bring openness to state government. Republican Mike Pence cited his Roadmap for Indiana as the way to take the state from good to great.

Photo provided

Ralph Nader doesn't know why Democrats aren't making raising the minimum wage a bigger issue during the campaign. He says there's a clear cut difference between Democrats and Republicans on the topic.

He made the comments before speaking on "Corporatism and Social Class" at Purdue.

Mike Conroy / Associated Press

Senate candidates Joe Donnelly and Richard Mourdock spent most of their first debate Monday attacking each other, while Libertarian Andrew Horning called for voters to move away from the status quo. 

Republican Senate hopeful Richard Mourdock says he doesn’t think the upcoming debates between him and his two opponents will get nearly as many viewers as his debate with Senator Richard Lugar in the May primary.  But with the race among the closest in the state, it’s possible there could be more interest than he realizes.  

Several polls in recent weeks all show Mourdock and Democratic opponent Joe Donnelly within just a few percentage points of each other in the race.  Mourdock says he hopes the debates will garner enough attention to have an impact on the campaign.

2012 early voting outpacing 2008 in Tippecanoe Co.

Oct 13, 2012

The first four days of early voting in Tippecanoe County brought 638 people into the Board of Elections office to cast a ballot.

The first week of early voting four years ago, during the last presidential election, produced 547 ballots. Tippecanoe County Circuit Clerk Christa Coffey says that’s a 14.3% increase this year.

“Many absentee ballots were sent and received” by the office, she says. “I’ll have official numbers by Monday morning.”

Mike Conroy / Associated Press

Gubernatorial candidates Mike Pence and John Gregg briefly launched attacks on each other’s records during Wednesday’s gubernatorial debate.  However, none of the candidates used the forum to say things they haven’t already said.

The debate featured questions from Hoosier voters on topics ranging from education, college affordability, the Affordable Care Act and the role of unions.  Republican Mike Pence, Democrat John Gregg and Libertarian Rupert Boneham all repeated ideas and positions they’ve been talking about throughout the campaign.

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