Elections & Politics

Rep. Todd Rokita (R-Brownsburg) reversed a previous decision, announcing Tuesday he will participate in a Senate GOP primary debate organized by the nonpartisan Indiana Debate Commission. (WFIU/WTIU)
Brandon Smith

Rep. Todd Rokita (R-Brownsburg) reversed a previous decision, announcing Tuesday he will participate in a Senate GOP primary debate organized by the nonpartisan Indiana Debate Commission.

Potential Spike In Young Voter Turnout, Poll Shows

Apr 12, 2018
A new national poll shows a potential spike in young people voting in this year’s midterm elections. (Daniel Morrison/Flickr)
Brandon Smith

A new national poll shows a potential spike in young people voting in this year’s midterm elections.

Thirty-seven percent of people under the age of 30 say they will definitely vote in November’s election. That’s up from 23 percent who said the same in 2014, the last midterm cycle.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

FOR SHERIFF

The Republican candidates for Tippecanoe County Sheriff focused on the opioid crisis in their debate Tuesday night.

Multiple questions about the drug epidemic were posed to incumbent Sheriff Barry Richard, Lieutenant John ‘Woody’ Ricks and West Lafayette Police Chief Jason Dombkowski.

Richard pointed toward the jail’s existing program where volunteers seek to help inmates struggling with addiction.

Donnelly Re-Election Campaign Targets Women Voters

Apr 10, 2018

Supporters for U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.)’s re-election campaign gathered in Indianapolis to make the case women should support Donnelly for a second term.

In 2016, 53 percent of Hoosier women voted for President Donald Trump.

But following the recent women’s marches in Indiana, Donnelly’s supporters, including state Rep. Cherrish Pryor (D-Indianapolis), say they are confident some of those same women, who voted for Trump, will vote for Donnelly.

Under Indiana law, you have to provide a reason you can’t vote on Election Day to get an absentee ballot. (Daniel Morrison/Flickr)
Brandon Smith

A bill to expand Indiana’s absentee voting law couldn’t make it over the finish line in 2018 as House Republicans blocked the bill from a hearing.

And House GOP members have conflicting explanations for why the bill died.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

A crowded pool of Republican candidates for the 4th district congressional seat met in Lafayette Saturday to debate issues ranging from gun control to federal spending and online security. The debate comes more than a month ahead of the May 8th primary.

Seven candidates are vying for the GOP nomination for what was previously Congressman Todd Rokita’s seat before he announced his run for Senate.

Tyler Lake / WTIU

Indiana’s three Republican candidates for U.S. Senate – former state Rep. Mike Braun, U.S.Rep. Luke Messer (R-Shelbyville), and U.S. Rep. Todd Rokita (R-Brownsburg) – will meet this week in the campaign’s first debate in the lead up to May’s primary.

The GOP primary’s tone has been described by some as nasty and rancorous. University of Indianapolis political science professor Laura Merrifield Wilson says that’s unlikely to change in the debate.

A Senate committee approved legislation Monday to ensure every valid absentee vote is counted – even if the voter dies before Election Day.

That approval comes despite objections from Secretary of State Connie Lawson’s office.

Current law invalidates absentee ballots if the voter dies after casting it, but before it’s counted on Election Day.

The Indiana Civic Health Index uses data from the census and the U.S. Elections Project to measure how much Hoosiers engage with their government and their community.

For example, one of the questions from the U.S. Elections Project – do you eat dinner with a family member frequently? Nearly 93 percent of Hoosiers said yes in 2016, ranking third in the country.

Hoosiers are more likely to attend public meetings, volunteer in community organizations and interact with their neighbors than in years past.

Courtesy McCoy Law / earlmccoy.com/About

A longtime Lafayette lawyer will be going head-to-head with Tippecanoe County Prosecutor Pat Harrington in next year’s election.

Earl McCoy founded McCoy Law in Lafayette 15 years ago, and practices family and criminal law.

McCoy announced Friday on Facebook that he’s running for Tippecanoe County Prosecutor.

He cites concerns about the murder trial of a man who was acquitted on charges of killing a Lafayette schoolteacher.

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