Elections & Politics

Congress is once again considering a bill to help pay off more student debt for veterinarians in high-need, rural areas.

The proposal has stalled in committee for the past several years – but advocates for Hoosier vets say it’s needed now more than ever.

Indiana’s two USDA-designated veterinarian shortage areas cover most of the west central part of the state – two districts made up of 17 counties, centered around the cities of Lafayette and Brazil.

Courtesy Indiana Office of Secretary of State

Indiana’s Secretary of State says the federal Department of Homeland Security accessed the state’s electoral system without Indiana’s permission before and after November’s presidential election. 

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Stephanie Wiechmann reports.

In an article in The Daily Caller – a news website founded by Fox News personality Tucker Carlson – Indiana Secretary of State Connie Lawson says officials with the federal agency scanned the state’s electoral system nearly 15,000 times. 

Advocates for redistricting reform had a message for lawmakers today at the Statehouse: “We’re not going anywhere.”

About 30 people, including representatives from six different advocacy groups, gathered to protest the collapse of redistricting reform efforts this session.

Crafted after a two years of study, House Bill 1014 had overwhelming support from those who attended an Elections Committee hearing, but Committee Chairman Milo Smith didn’t call it for a vote.

The Senate Local Government Committee will wait to vote on a bill that would require law enforcement to clear protesters from roadways by “any means necessary.”

The proposal raised alarm with lawmakers and members of the public Wednesday at its first hearing.

The bill, from state Sen. James Tomes (R-Wadesville), would require a mayor or other public official to dispatch all available law enforcement within 15 minutes of a report of a mass traffic obstruction.

President-elect Donald Trump has reportedly tapped former Indiana U.S. Sen. Dan Coats to be his national intelligence director.

Elected officials, including Coats’ former colleague U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-IN), are praising the choice. It had not been officially confirmed as of late Thursday afternoon.

If appointed, Coats would lead the nation’s intelligence community. The national intelligence post is separate from that of CIA director.

Trump Names Oklahoma Attorney General To Lead EPA

Dec 7, 2016

 

President-elect Donald Trump plans to nominate Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to lead the Environmental Protection Agency.

Pruitt is notable for suing the EPA over environmental regulations, including the Clean Power Plan. Indiana is also party to that lawsuit.

There are at least four Indiana names rumored to be on President-Elect Donald Trump’s short list for Secretary of Agriculture.

Most of the Hoosier prospects to run the U.S. Department of Agriculture were on the Trump campaign’s agricultural advisory team.

Those prospects include Indiana State Agriculture Secretary Ted McKinney, seed corn farmer and former Congressional hopeful Kip Tom and Fair Oaks Farms CEO Mike McCloskey.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

About 200 students marched through the Purdue University campus Wednesday to rally against president-elect Donald Trump. The protest was non-violent.

The rally’s student organizers aimed to show solidarity with minority groups who feel discriminated against by Donald Trump.

They cite his comments about minorities and women, calling his campaign “hate speech” and holding signs that read: “Dump Trump,” “Not My President” and “Love Trumps Hate.”

Judy Baxter / https://www.flickr.com/photos/judybaxter/

As the presidential election came to an end, a trending question among citizens went like this: how did the polls get it so wrong?

A pair of Indiana political scientists say some increasingly common errors led to this year’s wildly inaccurate political polling.

Butler University’s Gregory Shufeldt says groups such as minorities and disaffected white voters were consistently underrepresented.

Supporters Welcome Pence's Return To Indiana After Election

Nov 10, 2016

 

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence will soon be the sixth Hoosier to serve as the vice president of the United States.

After a long campaign to win that role, Pence returned home to Indianapolis on Thursday Nov. 10. He spoke to a crowd of roughly 300 supporters at the Indianapolis International Airport. Many in the energized crowd waved red and blue pom-poms.

“Pray that we may find our way forward as a nation, that we may renew the American dream,” Pence says to the crowd. “Heal the divisions in our country and move forward to a more prosperous future.”

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