Elections & Politics

Students Question Gov. Candidates In Race's First Debate

6 hours ago
NYC Department of Education / http://schools.nyc.gov/default.htm

This week’s first gubernatorial debate, a town-hall-style event at Indianapolis’ Lawrence North High School featured questions not from a moderator, but from students, teachers and administrators.

Republican candidate Eric Holcomb, Democratic candidate John Gregg and Libertarian candidate Rex Bell faced questions on standardized testing, Indiana’s teacher shortage, youth job availability and higher education. They laid out similar policy positions on almost all issues.

Holcomb Releases Education Platform

Sep 26, 2016
Brandon Smith / IPBS

Republican gubernatorial candidate Eric Holcomb unveiled his education plan Monday during the annual meeting of Indiana school boards and local superintendents.

He proposes using a combination of  federal, state, parental and private dollars to expanding the state's preschool program.

But he stops short of seeking universal pre-k.

Holcomb also wants teachers to feel they have a say in state policy discussions.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

One of the biggest issues in this year’s race for the Indiana House of Representatives District 26 seat may be how to improve the state’s education system.

In the first debate of the race Thursday, Democratic candidate Vicky Woeste said the state needs to reject what she calls the ALEC-driven education agenda, referring to the conservative group which drafts right-leaning legislation for statehouses across the country.

Woeste says she wants to restore public school funding, noting the West Lafayette School Corporation has asked for referendum funding due to cuts.

Courtesy Governor Mike Pence

Republican gubernatorial candidate Eric Holcomb unveiled the first policy proposals of his campaign, including economic development, infrastructure and energy initiatives.

The proposals were short on the specifics of funding:

Many of Lieutenant Governor Holcomb’s proposals are the continuation of initiatives begun by Gov. Mike Pence.

This includes a $1 billion entrepreneurship plan, a new port, a new bridge over the Ohio River, and growing the Regional Cities program.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

A scheduled test of Tippecanoe County’s new voter check-in equipment had to be postponed Monday when the company that supplies ballots failed to deliver a computer file in time.

The file, which gives audio of each candidate’s name and party affiliation, is used by voting machines to assist visually-impaired voters.

That prevented a public run-through of new technology the county has purchased from Votec – technology County Clerk Christa Coffey says she’s expecting the first delivery of this week.

Brandon Smith / IPBS

Indiana’s redistricting study committee discussed Monday some of the finer details of what redistricting reform would look like.

The study committee’s discussion – and much of the public testimony – focused on the formation, size and makeup of an independent redistricting commission, similar to those in other states.

The Coalition for Redistricting Reform, a private group of reform advocates, brought the committee a detailed plan for creating a nine-member commission. 

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The United Auto Workers union is criticizing Republican U.S. Senate candidate Todd Young for his past comments on the auto industry bailout.

UAW officials gathered in three union halls around the state Thursday to publicly attack Young.

The events coincide with a new ad from the Evan Bayh campaign. Both criticize Young for comments he made during his first congressional run in 2010, calling the federal auto industry bailout a “waste.”

Fairlife / Ballotpedia / Egg Industry Center

Three prominent Hoosier farmers will be part of the agricultural advisory committee for the Trump-Pence campaign.

The Indiana-based co-chairs of Trump's agriculture committee represent three of the largest and most well-connected farm businesses in the state and the country.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Republican precinct committeemen in Indiana’s 4th and 5th congressional districts voted Saturday to return Todd Rokita and Susan Brooks to their reelection campaigns.

U-S Representatives Susan Brooks and Todd Rokita each withdrew from their House races last month to vie for the GOP gubernatorial nomination, vacated when Mike Pence joined the presidential ticket.

When Lieutenant Governor Eric Holcomb got the nod, Brooks and Rokita immediately announced their intentions to return to their reelection campaigns.

Todd Rokita / http://rokita.house.gov/serving-you

U.S. Representatives Todd Rokita and Susan Brooks will seek to officially return to their congressional races Saturday.

Precinct committeemen in the 4th and 5th districts will meet to fill ballot vacancies created when Brooks and Rokita sought to replace Mike Pence on the GOP's gubernatorial ballot.

Immediately after Eric Holcomb became the nominee for governor, Rokita and Brooks announced their intentions to return to their reelection campaigns.

Pages